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Latest Ilaria Pascucci Stories

Study Sheds Light On Planetary Orbital Pile-Ups
2012-03-20 08:32:57

Researchers said they have found why some orbits seen in young solar systems seem to be more popular than others. Astronomers have been puzzled as to why giant gas planets like Jupiter and Saturn appear to occupy certain regions in mature solar systems while staying clear of others. Ilaria Pascucci, an assistant professor at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, said the final distribution of planets does not vary smoothly with distance from the star, but has clear...

2007-09-13 11:00:00

Astronomers have observed neon in disks of dust and gas swirling around sunlike stars for the first time. University of Arizona astronomers who collaborated in the observations say that neon could show which stars retain their surrounding dust-and-gas disks needed to form planets and which stars might already have formed planets. "When I saw the neon, I couldn't believe it. I was just amazed," said UA Steward Observatory astronomer Ilaria Pascucci. "We were not expecting to see neon around...

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2007-01-08 16:55:00

Gas-giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn form soon after their stars do, according to new research. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that gas giants either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The study offers new evidence that gas-giant planets must form early in a star's history. The lifespan of sun-like stars is about 10 billion years. Ilaria Pascucci of the University of Arizona Steward Observatory in Tucson led a team of...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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