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Latest Ildiko Lingvay Stories

2012-06-28 20:20:58

Intensive early treatment of type 2 diabetes slows down progression of the disease by preserving the body´s insulin-producing capacity, a UT Southwestern study has shown. “We can potentially change the course of this prevalent disease, which would represent a breakthrough,” said Dr. Ildiko Lingvay, assistant professor of internal medicine and author of the study published online in Diabetes Care. “The intensive treatment regimen we propose is different from the...

Treating Diabetes Early, Intensively Is Best Strategy
2012-06-28 08:48:40

Intensive early treatment of type 2 diabetes slows down progression of the disease by preserving the body's insulin-producing capacity, a UT Southwestern study has shown. "We can potentially change the course of this prevalent disease, which would represent a breakthrough," said Dr. Ildiko Lingvay, assistant professor of internal medicine and author of the study published online in Diabetes Care. "The intensive treatment regimen we propose is different from the stepwise approach...

2009-09-22 08:03:37

Researchers have long suspected that overweight people tend to have large fat deposits in their pancreases, but they've been unable to confirm or calculate how much fat resides there because of the organ's location. Until now. Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center are the first in the U.S. to use an imaging technique called magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the amount of pancreatic fat in humans. Though scientists worldwide already use MRS to investigate a number of...

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2009-08-11 10:15:00

 People diagnosed with type 2 diabetes often resist taking insulin because they fear gaining weight, developing low blood sugar and seeing their quality of life decline.A study recently completed at UT Southwestern Medical Center suggests that those fears are largely unfounded and that patients and physicians should consider insulin as a front-line defense, as opposed to a treatment of last resort for non-insulin-dependent diabetes.  "We found that those patients who received...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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