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Latest Immunity Stories

2008-09-24 12:00:37

U.S. scientists say the discovery of a new mechanism of immunity suggests a more effective pneumococcal vaccine might be in the offing. Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard School of Public Health researchers say there might be a better way to protect people against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. They said the current vaccine, Prevnar, is expensive and covers only 7 of the 91 known pneumococcal strains. Dr. Richard Malley and medical researcher Marc Lipsitch discovered that, in...

2008-08-21 06:01:02

SAN DIEGO, Aug. 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Vical Incorporated today announced that results from nonhuman primate studies of a Vaxfectin(R)-formulated DNA vaccine for measles, published in the August issue of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology(1), offer a promising approach to the development of a measles vaccine to address an unmet need for human infants. Vical recently reported breakthrough preliminary Phase 1 trial results for the company's H5N1 pandemic influenza DNA vaccines formulated...

2008-08-13 12:00:00

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Aug. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study has shown that a nasal hepatitis B vaccine elicits a dramatic immune response in animals without requiring three vaccinations, sterile syringes or refrigeration-three factors that impede the delivery of current hepatitis B vaccines. In the study, a single dose of the nasal vaccine triggered a protective response in animals roughly 450 times greater than that elicited by currently approved human vaccines. The animal studies demonstrate a...

2008-07-16 09:01:20

Garrett and Alisa are newlyweds with a new house and an 8-week-old French bulldog named Boston. Alisa knows Boston needs to be vaccinated but she has heard that even with vaccinations, Boston should not be allowed outside "for a while." Her question: How long is that? I can understand her confusion. With a little understanding of vaccinations and how they work, "a while" can be more accurately defined. Vaccinations are powerful tools to prevent several deadly diseases, some of which are...

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2008-03-03 12:15:00

ETH Zurich professor Peter Seeberger has been working on a sugar-based malaria vaccine for years. The new test takes him one important step closer to his goal. The malaria pathogen plasmodium falciparum carries poisonous sugar molecules "“ called GPIs for short "“ on its surface that are able to be individually identified. Professor See-berger's research team is now developing a new method that demonstrates that the malaria pathogen's toxic sugar molecules trigger a specific...

2007-01-08 09:27:58

MEXICO CITY -- Mexicans have long been taught to blame diseases brought by the Spaniards for wiping out most of their Indian ancestors. But recent research suggests things may not be that simple. While the initial big die-offs are still blamed on the Conquistadors who started arriving in 1519, even more virulent epidemics in 1545 and 1576 may have been caused by a native blood-hemorrhaging fever spread by rats, Mexican researchers say. The idea has sparked heated debate in Mexican academic...

2006-09-01 12:20:43

By Will Boggs, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) -- chemicals widely used in industry -- apparently reduces children's immune response to vaccinations, according to a report. "Pollutants, such as PCBs, may be partially responsible that vaccinations don't 'take' in some children," Dr. Philippe Grandjean from the University of Southern Denmark, Odense, told Reuters Health. "I believe that this is yet another reason to protect children -- and...

2006-08-01 10:52:12

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Vaccination against tetanus may offer protection against the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study from Boston-based researchers. Dr. Miguel A. Hernan and colleagues from Harvard School of Public Health pooled data from nine studies published between 1966 and 2005 that looked at the association between tetanus vaccination and MS risk. Analyses centered on a total of 963 MS cases and 3126 controls. They found that a history of...

2005-10-11 12:21:31

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A single course of hepatitis A and B vaccine is enough to protect most healthy travelers from contracting these infections, and current evidence suggests this protection is lifelong, a team of travel medicine experts concludes. Hepatitis A and B are serious vaccine-preventable diseases. While the benefit of primary hepatitis A and B vaccination is well established, recommendations on the use of booster shots vary around the world, Dr. Jane N. Zuckerman of...

2005-06-12 14:18:55

Parents often wonder why it takes a year or more and multiple shots to fully immunize their children against diseases like diphtheria and pertussis. The reason is twofold. First, a single vaccination generates only a small amount of immunity and booster shots are needed to build up immunity to protective levels. The second reason is due to the fact that a substantial "lag time" is required by the immune system between initial immunization and subsequent booster shots to maximize the size of...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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