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Latest Impact events Stories

2009-08-06 14:54:19

Global calamities like the one that doomed most dinosaurs forever alter the varieties of life found on Earth, but new research shows that it doesn't take a catastrophe to end entire lineages. An analysis of 200 million years of history for marine clams found that vulnerability to extinction runs in evolutionary families, even when the losses result form ongoing, background rates of extinction."Biologists have long suspected that the evolutionary history of species and lineages play a big role...

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2009-08-03 06:40:00

It began with a furrowed brow, a moment of puzzlement, quickly dismissed. The date was July 19, 2009. Amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley was photographing Jupiter from his backyard observatory in Murrumbateman, Australia, when something odd caught his eye. "My attention was fixed on the Great Red Spot, which was setting beautifully over Jupiter's horizon," recalls Wesley. "I almost didn't notice the dark blemish near Jupiter's south pole, and when I did, I put it out of my mind." It's just...

2009-07-25 12:33:15

The newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope is sending back exquisite pictures of debris from an object that collided with Jupiter, NASA officials said. Scientists interrupted calibration of Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, installed by astronauts in May, to photograph the debris field 360 million miles away, said Heidi Hammel, Hubble's lead astronomer at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. Hubble is in orbit 347 miles above the Earth. Hubble's truly exquisite imaging capability has...

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2009-07-20 19:20:00

Scientists have found evidence that another object has bombarded Jupiter, exactly 15 years after the first impacts by the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. Following up on a tip by an amateur astronomer, Anthony Wesley of Australia, that a new dark "scar" had suddenly appeared on Jupiter, this morning between 3 and 9 a.m. PDT (6 a.m. and noon EDT) scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, gathered...

2009-06-30 16:04:41

U.S. scientists say research involving the exhaust plume from a NASA space shuttle launch suggests the 1908 Tunguska explosion was caused by a comet The mysterious explosion leveled 830 square miles of Siberian forest and a cause has never been determined. But Cornell University researchers say findings from their study indicated the explosion was nearly certainly caused by a comet entering the Earth's atmosphere. It's almost like putting together a 100-year-old murder mystery, said Professor...

2008-10-21 15:00:16

U.S. scientists say the Earth is in the midst of its sixth mass extinction of plants and animals, with nearly 50 percent of all species disappearing. Biologists at the University of California-Santa Barbara say they are working to determine which species must be saved. "The current extinction event is due to human activity, paving the planet, creating pollution, many of the things that we are doing today," said study co-author Assistant Professor Bradley Cardinale. "The Earth might well...

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2008-10-07 10:34:46

Evidence suggests that 'sick Earth' extinctions more likely In geology as in cancer research, the silver bullet theory always gets the headlines and nearly always turns out to be wrong. For geologists who study mass extinctions, the silver bullet is a giant asteroid plunging to earth. But an asteroid is the prime suspect only in the most recent of five mass extinctions, said USC earth scientist David Bottjer. The cataclysm 65 million years ago wiped out the dinosaurs. "The other four have not...

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2008-08-31 10:00:00

By Robert S. Boyd / McClatchy Newspapers It was the greatest mass murder of all time - poison everywhere, billions slain - but the killers have never been positively identified. An estimated 95 percent of marine species and 85 percent of land creatures died, said Peter Ward, a paleobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Scientists call it "The Great Dying." Life took millions of years to recover. Scientific sleuths now think they're making progress toward learning what...

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2008-07-15 15:35:00

The Tunguska catastrophe in 1908 evidently led to high levels of acid rain. This is the conclusion reached by Russian, Italian and German researchers based on the results of analyses of peat profiles taken from the disaster region. In peat samples corresponded to 1908 permafrost boundary they found significantly higher levels of the heavy nitrogen and carbon isotopes 15N and 13C. The highest accumulation levels were measured in the areas at the epicenter of the explosion and along the...

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2008-07-02 15:10:00

Geological evidence found in Ohio and Indiana in recent weeks is strengthening the case to attribute what happened 12,900 years ago in North America -- when the end of the last Ice Age unexpectedly turned into a phase of extinction for animals and humans "“ to a cataclysmic comet or asteroid explosion over top of Canada. A comet/asteroid theory advanced by Arizona-based geophysicist Allen West in the past two years says that an object from space exploded just above the earth's surface...


Latest Impact events Reference Libraries

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2004-10-19 04:45:40

Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 -- Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 is so-named because it was the ninth short-period comet discovered by Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker and David Levy. It was first detected in a photograph taken on the night of March 24, 1993 with the 0.4-meter Schmidt telescope at the Mount Palomar observatory in California, and subsequently observed by many other astronomers. The comet was extremely unusual because it was in fragments, evidently due to a close encounter with the planet...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.