Quantcast

Latest Implications of nanotechnology Stories

2011-03-10 15:19:06

Oversight Challenges Still Exist Nanotech consumer products continue to grow at a consistent pace. According to the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) over 1,300 manufacturer-identified, nanotechnology-enabled products have entered the commercial marketplace around the world. The most recent update to the group's five-year-old inventory reflects the continuing use of the tiny particles in everything from conventional products like non-stick cookware to more unique items such as...

2010-12-20 19:11:49

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at UC Santa Barbara has produced a groundbreaking study of how nanoparticles are able to biomagnify in a simple microbial food chain. "This was a simple scientific curiosity," said Patricia Holden, professor in UCSB's Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and the corresponding author of the study, published in an early online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology. "But it is also of great importance to this new field of looking...

2010-11-29 18:22:40

MU scientists make strides in green nanotechnology Gold nanoparticles, tiny pieces of gold so small that they can't be seen by the naked eye, are used in electronics, healthcare products and as pharmaceuticals to fight cancer. Despite their positive uses, the process to make the nanoparticles requires dangerous and extremely toxic chemicals. While the nanotechnology industry is expected to produce large quantities of nanoparticles in the near future, researchers have been worried about the...

2010-11-17 17:18:59

Tiny particles used in a range of everyday products from computers to shampoo can adversely affect the lungs in very different ways, a study has shown Tiny particles used in a range of everyday products from computers to shampoo can adversely affect the lungs in very different ways, a study has shown. Research by the University of Edinburgh suggests that industrial manufacturers using nanoparticles should be aware of the risks that different types of nanoparticles pose to workers who handle...

2010-11-16 21:44:16

New study examines nanoparticles' effects on plants Using particles that are 1/100,000 the width of a human hair to deliver drugs to cells or assist plants in fighting off pests may sound like something out of a science fiction movie, but these scenarios may be a common occurrence in the near future. Carbon nanotubes, cylindrically shaped carbon molecules with a diameter of about 1 nanometer, have many potential applications in a variety of fields, such as biomedical engineering and medical...

d81e34b7ef1c1ebba073b73dfd4874c41
2010-11-04 07:43:18

Bricks, blocks, and steel I-beams "” step aside. A new genre of construction materials, made from stuff barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, is about to debut in the building of homes, offices, bridges, and other structures. And a new report is highlighting both the potential benefits of these nanomaterials in improving construction materials and the need for guidelines to regulate their use and disposal. The report appears in the monthly journal ACS Nano. Pedro Alvarez and...

2010-10-21 08:00:00

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) will celebrate its tenth anniversary with the National Nanotechnology Innovation Summit, December 8-10 at the Gaylord National Convention Center, National Harbor Maryland. The Summit will feature directors and program managers from the NNI's top federal agencies, along with some of the nation's most influential innovators and corporate integrators, discussing nanotechnology priorities, opportunities and...

2010-08-16 14:40:07

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a method for predicting the ways nanoparticles will interact with biological systems "“ including the human body. Their work could have implications for improved human and environmental safety in the handling of nanomaterials, as well as applications for drug delivery. NC State researchers Dr. Jim Riviere, Burroughs Wellcome Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and director of the university's Center for Chemical...

405b083e300626f943e1dc7107787e691
2010-08-08 20:50:01

Produced by volcanic explosions, nanoparticles "“ about a thousand times smaller than a fly's eye "“ have always been part of the earth's atmosphere. Used, if not understood, by artisans for centuries, nanomaterials have been part of pottery glazes, metallurgy and the glass work of cathedrals.  Produced by diesel exhaust, they have been a human-generated pollutant since before the term nanotechnology was coined.  In the modern age, the possibilities for technological...

2010-07-28 14:53:20

Nanotechnology refers to a broad range of tools, techniques and applications that simply involve particles on the approximate size scale of a few to hundreds of nanometers in diameter. Particles of this size have some unique physicochemical and surface properties that lend themselves to novel uses. Indeed, advocates of nanotechnology suggest that this area of research could contribute to solutions for some of the major problems we face on the global scale such as ensuring a supply of safe...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
Related