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Latest Impurity Stories

2014-05-20 08:23:40

LEEDS, England, May 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Lhasa Limited, a leading global supplier of knowledge-based software and associated databases, today announces an industry collaboration to develop software that can help experts assess the likelihood of the potential carryover of impurities (including those that are genotoxic) without exhaustive analytical testing. The use of highly reactive compounds is often necessary for chemical synthesis and these can potentially be...

2014-05-08 09:33:20

"What a curious feeling," says Alice in Lewis Carroll's tale, as she shrinks to a fraction of her size, and everything around her suddenly looks totally unfamiliar. Scientists too have to get used to these curious feelings when they examine matter on tiny scales and at low temperatures: all the behavior we are used to seeing around us is turned on its head. In research published today in the journal Nature Communications, UCL scientists have made a startling discovery about a familiar...

2014-04-18 16:16:58

Research from North Carolina State University finds that impurities can hurt performance – or possibly provide benefits – in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in a host of applications, including future particle colliders. The size of the impurities determines whether they help or hinder the material’s performance. At issue is a superconductive material called bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (Bi2212). A superconductor is a material that can carry...

2012-05-23 20:48:42

Detection procedures, acceptable limits for testing established by USP As part of its ongoing efforts to help ensure the quality of medicines, the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) has announced two new standards related to elemental impurities: General Chapters <232> Elemental Impurities–Limits and <233> Elemental Impurities–Procedures. The new standards provide procedures for the detection of selected impurities in drug products based on modern analytical...

2012-03-14 21:28:46

New American Chemical Society podcast The latest episode in the American Chemical Society's (ACS) award-winning "Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions" podcast series describes the development of a new test that could help track down and prosecute terrorists. Amid concerns about the threat of terrorist attacks, scientists have been seeking better protection for the U.S. and other nations. One such team has developed a technique that could help authorities catch terrorists and put them...

Bright Lights Of Purity
2012-01-31 04:43:01

Berkeley Lab Researchers Discover Why Pure Quantum Dots and Nanorods Shine Brighter To the lengthy list of serendipitous discoveries — gravity, penicillin, the New World — add this: Scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)´s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered why a promising technique for making quantum dots and nanorods has so far been a disappointment. Better still, they´ve also discovered how to correct the problem. A...

2011-12-14 14:52:01

Scientists are reporting development of a first-of-its-kind technology that could help law enforcement officials trace the residues from terrorist attacks involving nerve gas and other chemical agents back to the companies or other sources where the perpetrators obtained ingredients for the agent. A report on the technique, which could eventually help track down perpetrators of chemical attacks, appears in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. Carlos Fraga and colleagues explain that nerve...

2010-09-29 14:14:41

Drug manufacturers have been adjusting to strict new government standards that limit the amount of potentially harmful impurities in medicine, according to the cover story of the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. The impurities are "genotoxic," capable of damaging the DNA in genes. C&EN Senior Correspondent Ann Thayer notes that internationally accepted regulations long have limited the levels of impurities permitted in prescription...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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