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Latest In vitro meat Stories

World's First Lab-Grown Burger Comes To The Dinner Table
2013-08-05 07:17:55

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a world's first, Prof. Mark Post of Maastricht University and colleagues are preparing to consume a lab-grown burger and the event will be shown live today. The team explains the burger, which will be grilled up like a regular ground beef burger, could help bring an end to the global food crisis due to the effects of climate change. As the world's population continues to balloon toward 9 billion by mid-century, experts worry...

First Test Tube Burger To Be Served Up Next Month
2013-05-13 14:50:18

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online In the summer of 2011, Mark Post, a professor of physiology at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, made headlines when he first began to discuss the real possibilities of creating a test tube burger. Though Post claims these burgers will be important to remove some of the dependence humans have on livestock for food, many were unable to get past headlines which bore the phrase “Test-tube Burger.” With some...

World’s First Lab-Engineered Burger Just Months Away
2012-02-20 14:13:34

A team of privately funded Dutch researchers have reached a benchmark in the science of bioengineering. Using only stem cells, they´ve managed to grow a strip of muscle tissue in a Petri dish with the aim of eventually developing techniques for the mass production of eco-friendly lab-engineered meat. By October of this year, Dr. Mark post of Maastricht University hopes to have world-renowned chef Heston Blumenthal of England´s famous Fat Duck restaurant cook-up the world´s...

Are You Ready For A Lab-Grown Hamburger Patty?
2011-11-14 10:17:09

The future of your backyard BBQ may be a bit different from what you are used to if researchers have their way.  Along with a growing global population that has recently passed 7-billion people, comes an ever-growing hunger for meat, which needs inherently inefficient resources to grow, sustain, process and ship those products to the table. Vascular biologist Mark Post, from the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands, hopes to grow animal protein, or cultured meat, burgers or...

2011-10-18 13:05:35

Vampires on the True Blood television series are already enjoying the advantages of synthetic blood. While this may seem to be only the imagination on the big screen, the true benefits of blood manufactured from embryonic stem cells may be less than a decade away. It is unclear however whether society can develop an acceptance of cultured blood - or an appetite for synthetic meat produced by related technology.  For this reason it is vital the public has every opportunity to get...

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2011-06-28 09:20:00

Dutch scientists claim they will be able to produce edible meat grown from stem cells within a year, and believe lab-grown meat in the future will ultimately end the world's reliance on meat from livestock. And furthermore, the researchers predict that over the next few decades the world population will balloon so rapidly that there will not be enough livestock to feed everyone. As a result, laboratory-grown beef, chicken and pork would become necessary. A burger, grown from 10,000 stem...

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2010-01-16 15:05:00

A technology that allows pig stem cells to be converted into strips of meat might one day offer a solution to world hunger and a green alternative to raising livestock, scientists say. Researchers in the Netherlands have been growing pork in laboratory environments since 2006, and while they acknowledge they have not perfected the texture or even tasted the meat, they say the technique has broad implications for the world's food supply. "If we took the stem cells from one pig and multiplied...

2005-07-07 09:00:00

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Laboratories using new tissue engineering technology might be able to produce meat that is healthier for consumers and cut down on pollution produced by factory farming, researchers said on Wednesday. While NASA engineers have grown fish tissue in lab dishes, no one has seriously proposed a way to grow meat on commercial levels. But a new study conducted by University of Maryland doctoral student Jason Matheny and his colleagues describe two possible ways to do it....

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2005-07-06 17:55:00

WASHINGTON -- Laboratories using new tissue engineering technology might be able to produce meat that is healthier for consumers and cut down on pollution produced by factory farming, researchers said on Wednesday. While NASA engineers have grown fish tissue in lab dishes, no one has seriously proposed a way to grow meat on commercial levels. But a new study conducted by University of Maryland doctoral student Jason Matheny and his colleagues describe two possible ways to do it. Writing in...