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Latest Incertae sedis Stories

How The Mollusc Got Its Teeth Revealed By Ancient Fossils
2012-08-22 15:06:06

The radula sounds like something from a horror movie — a conveyor belt lined with hundreds of rows of interlocking teeth. In fact, radulas are found in the mouths of most molluscs, from the giant squid to the garden snail. Now, a "prototype" radula found in 500-million-year-old fossils studied by University of Toronto graduate student Martin Smith, shows that the earliest radula was not a flesh-rasping terror, but a tool for humbly scooping food from the muddy sea floor. The Cambrian...

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2010-11-10 10:15:00

Beginning around 542 million years ago, a profusion of animals with shells and skeletons began to appear in the fossil record. So many life forms appeared during this time that it is often referred to as the "Cambrian Explosion." Geologists at UC Santa Barbara and a team of co-authors have proposed a rethinking of the timeline of these early animal appearances. Their findings are published in the latest issue of the Geological Society of America Bulletin. Charles Darwin, in his book "On the...

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2008-03-20 14:30:00

UC-Riverside paleontologist makes discovery using fossils excavated in South Australian outback RIVERSIDE, Calif. "“ Two paleontologists studying ancient fossils they excavated in the South Australian outback argue that Earth's ecosystem has been complex for hundreds of millions of years "“ at least since around 565 million years ago, which is included in a period in Earth's history called the Neoproterozoic era. Until now, the dominant paradigm in the field of paleobiology has...

2007-11-11 03:00:00

By Shen, Bing Xiao, Shuhai; Dong, Lin; Zhou, Chuanming; Liu, Jianbo ABSTRACT- Upper Neoproterozoic successions in the North China and nearby Chaidam blocks are poorly documented. North China successions typically consist of a diamictite unit overlain by siltstone, sandstone, or slate. Similar successions occur in Chaidam, although a cap carbonate lies atop the diamictite unit. The diamictites in both blocks have been variously interpreted as Cryogenian, Ediacaran, or Cambrian glacial...

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2007-04-27 11:10:00

Scientists at the University of Chicago and the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., have produced new evidence to finally resolve the mysterious identity of what they regard as one of the weirdest organisms that ever lived. Their chemical analysis indicates that the organism was a fungus, the scientists report in the May issue of the journal of Geology, published by the Geological Society of America. Called Prototaxites (pronounced pro-toe-tax-eye-tees), the organism went...