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Latest Incremental dating Stories

64a9bffdd44e677707a7e57df70da00b1
2008-11-19 10:30:00

When Ohio State glaciologists failed to find the expected radioactive signals in the latest core they drilled from a Himalayan ice field, they knew it meant trouble for their research. But those missing markers of radiation, remnants from atomic bomb tests a half-century ago, foretell much greater threat to the half-billion or more people living downstream of that vast mountain range. It may mean that future water supplies could fall far short of what's needed to keep that population alive....

2008-10-01 03:00:13

By Anonymous Underwater voyeurs vied for spots to dive reefs in the Florida Keys for the annual coral spawning, sparked by the August full moon. "It's pretty amazing to see how it works," said Dan Dawson, owner of Horizon Divers (Key Largo, Florida). "My wife sat there in the sand for an hour and all of a sudden saw the coral secretion and then saw it floating away." While corals use multiple reproductive strategies, nearly all large reefbuilding species release millions of gametes once a...

2008-09-02 12:00:00

U.S. climate scientists say the Northern Hemisphere's surface temperatures were higher during the past decade than at any time during the last 1,300 years. The researchers said if they include somewhat controversial data derived from tree-ring records, the warming is anomalous for at least 1,700 years. "Some have argued tree-ring data is unacceptable for this type of study," said Penn State Associate Professor Michael Mann. "Now we can eliminate tree rings and still have enough data from...

2008-08-07 15:00:30

A U.S.-led study has used tree rings to investigate human-induced climate change that's projected to cause drier conditions in the mid-latitudes. To assess whether drier weather conditions have started, Ramzi Touchan of the University of Arizona and colleagues studied newly developed multi-century tree ring records from Tunisia and Algeria for a longer-term perspective on northwestern African drought. Using a set of 13 chronologies from Atlas cedars and Aleppo pines, the scientists...

a069bccb1c0825e8ad4f537618d8be051
2008-08-06 11:48:37

A better understanding of climate variations at planetary scale is one of climate scientists' crucial concerns. Stable water isotope analysis, the chemistry of ice cores taken from the Arctic and Antarctic polar ice caps and of air bubbles trapped in them now allow a chronology to be drawn up of the climate changes that took place over the past 800 000 years. However, those data, collected at extreme latitudes, are not enough for understanding climatic interactions operating at the scale of...

2008-07-17 06:00:28

Text of report in English by Taiwanese newspaper Taipei Times website on 17 July [Article by Meggie Lu staff Reporter from the "Taiwan" page: "Government Urged To Map the Seas To Protect Corals"] OCEAN ENVIRONMENT: Fishermen say mapping would help determine the impact of coral harvesting and help forge a balance with efforts to protect marine resources Thursday, Jul 17, 2008, Page 2 Environmental activists and coral fishermen reached consensus during a public hearing yesterday that...

2008-07-06 00:00:12

By Samantha Critchell NEW YORK -- Sea coral is blessed with wonderful colors, an intricate design and memories of the lapping ocean. It's no wonder that the worlds of fashion and home decor are in the midst of a love affair with it. Some argue, though, that coral is too precious to wear. "We want to discourage consumers from purchasing coral," says scientist Andrew Baker. "It's like ivory. It's a product of a living animal, and the harvest of this item is unsustainable." It's...

da10403cfa246d6adc365d51db6c423e1
2008-04-29 16:15:00

The state of Alaska has the dubious distinction of leading the lower 48 in the effects of a warming climate. Small villages are slipping into the sea due to coastal erosion, soggy permafrost is cracking buildings and trapping trucks.In an effort to better understand how the Pacific Northwest fits into the larger climate-change picture, scientists from the University of New Hampshire and University of Maine are heading to Denali National Park on the second leg of a multi-year mission to...

c1dde12ea8dcfcedaffc366a4f6d775f1
2008-04-17 09:50:00

New model will be helpful in designing future marine reservesThe Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth have developed a new scientific model that accurately maps where coral reefs are in the most trouble and identifies regions where reefs can be protected best. The model, which is being applied in areas throughout the Indian Ocean, is described in a recent issue of the UK-based journal Ecological Modelling.The model...

999d18559f84c9708c392a4c243558ac1
2008-03-24 11:25:00

Over two hundred million humans depend for their subsistence on the fact that coral has an addiction to "Ëœjunk food' - and orders its partners, the symbiotic algae, to make it.This curious arrangement is one of nature's most delicate and complex partnerships "“ a collaboration now facing grave threats from climate change.The symbiosis between coral "“ a primitive animal "“ and zooxanthellae, tiny one-celled plants, is not only powerful enough to build the largest...


Latest Incremental dating Reference Libraries

800px-Capnella_sp
2012-04-03 17:35:45

Nephtheidae is a family of soft corals known as carnation corals, tree corals or colt soft corals. These corals are very striking and show a wide range of rich colors including red, pink, yellow and purple. These corals are mainly tree-like in that they branch out and have little knobs on the end of their rubbery branches. Another name given these animals are broccoli corals, due to the fact that their polyps retract in the daytime, giving them the resemblance of the vegetable. The polyps...

800px-Fungia_scutaria_1
2012-04-03 16:17:43

Fungia scutaria is a species of mushroom coral in the family Fungiidae. It is found in the Indo-Pacific oceanic region. It occurs on upper reef slopes especially where there is considerable water movement. It is typically found on sand beds or coral fragments. It lives as a single individual rather than as a colony and is detached from the seabed. It has an elongated shape and can grow quite large. The polyp can be up to 6.7 inches long and is embedded in a cup-shaped hollow known as a...

Stephanosoenia_michelinii_1
2012-04-03 14:18:34

Astrocoeniidae is a family of stony corals endemic to the waters around Papua New Guinea and northern Australia. Their habitats are steep slopes where strong currents rise from below, in crevices and below overhangs. These are reef-building colonial corals containing an algae known as zooxanthallae. These algae typically encrust corals up to 20 inches in diameter. On reef slopes, where water is more turbid (cloudy/murky), they are much smaller, only reaching 2 inches across. The World...

720px-Folded_Coral_Flynn_Reef
2012-04-03 14:15:16

Alcyoniidae is a family of leathery corals that occur globally in temperate and tropical seas. These reef dwellers are often found in wave-exposed areas of reef crests, less turbid waters in lagoons, on steep slopes, under overhangs, and at depths of 100 feet and deeper. A colony of leathery coral is stiff, hard, and inflexible. It is composed of tiny polyps projecting from a shared leathery tissue. There are two kinds of polyps seen in Alcyoniidae corals: autozooids have long trunks and...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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