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Latest Indian ocean Stories

Some Southern Indian Ocean Humpback Whales Sing A Different Tune
2012-02-02 13:39:10

Researchers from WCS, Columbia University, and others find an unusual divide in song themes sung by whales in Madagascar and western Australia A recently published study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and others reveals that humpback whales on both sides of the southern Indian Ocean are singing different tunes, unusual since humpbacks in the same ocean basin usually all sing very similar songs. The results of the study–conducted by researchers from WCS, Columbia University,...

Wandering Albatross Alters Its Foraging Due To Climate Change
2012-01-14 03:55:04

Adapting to changing environmental conditions in the Southern Ocean Wandering albatrosses have altered their foraging due to changes in wind fields in the southern hemisphere during the last decades. Since winds have increased in intensity and moved to the south, the flight speed of albatrosses increased and they spend less time foraging. As a consequence, breeding success has improved and birds have gained 1 kilogram. These are the results of the study of an international research team...

Image 1 - Scientists To Study Indian Ocean Oscillation For Long-Term Weather Forecasting
2011-09-23 06:05:47

  Scientists from all over the world will be gathering in the Indian Ocean starting next month to study the Madden-Julian Oscillation. This disturbance originates in the equatorial Indian Ocean every 30 to 90 days and is part of the Asian and Australian monsoons, can enhance hurricane activity in the northeast Pacific and Gulf of Mexico, trigger torrential rainfall along the west coast of North America and affect the onset of El Nino. The campaign, known as DYNAMO (Dynamics of the...

Counting Fish From Space
2011-09-19 04:21:59

  A young research scientist who has studied fish from outer space in order to help predict the future of our coral reefs and their fish stocks is this year´s winner of a prestigious science prize. Dr Nick Graham of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University is this year´s laureate in the Life Sciences & Biological Sciences category of the Scopus Young Researcher of the Year Awards. The Scopus Awards are presented annually by...

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2011-07-14 13:49:07

Climate scientists are using the U.S. and Australian navies to deploy robotic measuring devices in the pirate-infested Indian Ocean. About a quarter of the Indian Ocean is off limits to climate scientists due to pirates making the waters too dangerous for research. "We have not been able to seed about one quarter of the Indian Ocean since the increase in the piracy and that has implications for understanding a region of influence in Australian and south Asian weather and climate," CSIRO...

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2011-06-27 09:25:00

Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the Americas By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis The coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. What's more, until it is needed for some other purpose it...

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2011-04-29 06:26:50

Increased Agulhas "leakage" significant player in global climate variability The Agulhas Current which runs along the east coast of Africa may not be as well known as its counterpart in the Atlantic, the Gulf Stream. But now researchers are taking a closer look at this current and its "leakage" from the Indian Ocean into the Atlantic Ocean--and what that may mean for climate change In results of a study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature, a team of scientists led by...

2011-04-27 23:59:49

Threading the climate needle: The Agulhas system The Agulhas Current which runs along the east coast of Africa may not be as well known as its counterpart in the Atlantic, the Gulf Stream, but researchers are now taking a much closer look at this current and its "leakage" from the Indian Ocean into the Atlantic Ocean. In a study published in the journal Nature, April 27, a global team of scientists led by University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Associate...

2011-03-28 08:11:00

SAN MATEO, Calif., March 28, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- AlphaDetail, a leader in global primary market research for the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, just completed a year of record revenue and profitability, making it one of the fastest growing market research companies in the United States. "On March 21, 2011 - the first day of spring - AlphaDetail celebrated its 10-year anniversary," announced Rishi Varma, President & CEO. The company has a long history of philanthropy,...

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2011-03-27 10:25:40

Study by Wildlife Conservation Society, AMNH, on dolphins finds invisible oceanographic factors that keep populations separateConservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and other conservation and research groups have discovered that groups of dolphins in the western Indian Ocean do not mix freely with one another. In fact, dolphin populations are kept separate by currents and other unseen factors.Specifically, the researchers have found...


Latest Indian ocean Reference Libraries

Persian Gulf
2013-04-18 13:55:23

The Persian Gulf is located in the western part of Asia between Iran and the Arabian Peninsula. It’s an addition to the Indian Ocean. The Gulf was the focal point of the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq War, which each side assaulted the other’s oil tankers. In the year 1991, the Persian Gulf again was the background for what was known as the “Persian Gulf War” or otherwise known as the “Gulf War”, despite the fact that this disagreement was mainly a land conflict, when Iraq raided Kuwait...

601px-Echinophilia
2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

800px-Discosoma
2012-04-03 15:24:52

Discosoma (or Actinodiscus) is a genus of soft mushroom coral native to the Indian Ocean. This genus is sometimes incorrectly referred to as mushroom anemone or disc anemone. This coral is commonly collected and used worldwide in marine aquariums, where it is known to grow easily. There are 5 known species of mushroom coral: Actinodiscus dawydoffi, Actinodiscus fungiformis, Discosoma nummiforme, Actinodiscus rubraoris, and Actinodiscus unguja.

800px-Fungia_paumotensis
2012-04-03 14:30:21

Plate Coral, (Fungia paumotensis), is a species of stony coral that occurs in the Indian Ocean on upper reef slopes especially where there is considerable movement of the water from wave action. It is usually found on sand or beds of coral fragments. This solitary, non-colonial coral is free living and not attached to the seabed. It is elongated and oval in shape and can grow rather large. Its single large polyp can be up to 9.8 inches long and is embedded in a cup shaped hollow known as...

Amsterdam Albatross, Diomedea amsterdamensis
2012-01-11 16:31:30

Amsterdam Albatross or Amsterdam Island Albatross, (Diomedea amsterdamensis), is a species of albatross belonging to the Diomedeidae family. It was first described in 1983 and was originally believed to be a subspecies of the Wandering Albatross. BirdLife International now recognizes it as a separate species, but it is still considered a subspecies to some. The Amsterdam Albatross breeds only on Amsterdam Island, French Southern Territories in the southern Indian Ocean, at an elevation...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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