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Latest Indiana bat Stories

Bat Death Toll From White-nose Syndrome Keeps Climbing
2012-01-18 13:08:42

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said on Tuesday that the death toll for bats in North America that have suffered from White-nose Syndrome has exceeded 5.5 million. Biologists and partners of the service estimated that at least 5.7 million to 6.7 million bats have died from white-nose syndrome (WNS). The syndrome was first documented in New York in 2006, and the disease quickly spread into 16 states and four Canadian provinces. Bats with WNS have symptoms like flying around outside...

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2011-06-29 11:21:12

Two bat species found in the US are another step closer to being declared an endangered species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, reprots the Associated Press (AP). Dying off from a devastating fungus that has killed off caves full of bats, the very existence of two bat species is in jeopardy. The agency is launching a 90-day investigation into whether the eastern small-footed bat and the northern long-eared bat need protection under the Endangered Species Act. The two species would be...

2011-02-03 17:41:30

Scientists suggest a roadmap to tackle disease which has killed over 1 million bats Conservationists across the United States are racing to discover a solution to White-Nose Syndrome, a disease that is threatening to wipe out bat species across North America. A review published in Conservation Biology reveals that although WNS has already killed one million bats, there are critical knowledge gaps preventing researchers from combating the disease. WNS is a fatal disease that targets...

2010-04-07 10:57:39

A leading bat expert with the USDA Forest Service's Southern Research Station today identified nine bat species in Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee that she believes are most threatened by white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungus that kills bats and appears to be rapidly spreading south from the northeastern United States. Station Research Ecologist Susan Loeb, Ph.D. says WNS has been confirmed in Tennessee, and she says it is just a matter of time before the fungus...

2010-01-12 12:34:00

Three years later, hibernating bats continue to fall to this disorder HARRISBURG, Pa., Jan. 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has caused cave bat population reductions in New York and New England over the past three winters. It surfaced near Albany in 2006. Pennsylvania Game Commission officials say that they are expecting cave bat mortalities this winter if the disorder spreads through hibernacula as it did New York and New England over the previous winters. To track...

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2008-10-31 09:15:00

A nasty fungus is killing hundreds of thousands of bats in the northeastern United States, scientists said Thursday. The previously unknown fungus thrives in chilly temperatures. It's a white, powdery-looking organism found on the muzzles, ears and wings of dead and dying bats hibernating in caves in New York, Maine, Vermont and Connecticut. The study was published in the journal Nature. "Essentially, hibernating bats are getting moldy as they hang from their cave ceiling," David Blehert,...

2008-07-08 06:00:00

By Dan Vergano Biologists are stumped by a plague that has killed tens of thousands, and perhaps hundreds of thousands, of bats this year in Northeastern states. The cause of "white-nose syndrome," so named because of the white fungus that appears on bats' noses and wings, remains a mystery. And the plague is still killing bats, alarming scientists who had considered it a winter syndrome. "The surprise for us has been finding out that bats are still dying," says biologist Susi von...


Latest Indiana bat Reference Libraries

Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalist
2012-10-05 08:36:41

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist) is a mouse-eared bat that can be found in North America. Its range primarily includes eastern and Midwestern states, but it can be found in some southern areas of the United States. During the winter, its range becomes much smaller, with most populations occurring in large clusters in only a few caves. One study conducted in 1985 suggested that an estimated 244,000 individuals of this species reside in Indiana. Its range overlaps that of the endangered gray...

Little Brown Bat, Myotis lucifugus
2012-05-03 12:32:22

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) is also known as the little brown myotis. It is a species in the Myotis genus, or mouse-eared bats. It is one of the most common North American bats, and is a good species to use when studying bats. This species has been included in the Mammalian Genome Project. The range of this bat includes the northern half of the United States and southern Canada. More males than females have been found in the northern range of the little brown bat, but there has...

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2008-05-02 12:51:39

The Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens), is a small bat that lives in caves throughout the southern United States. It usually chooses caves which are located within one mile of a river or reservoir. The range of the endangered gray bat is concentrated in the cave regions of Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama, with occasional colonies and individuals found in adjacent states. The species' present total population is estimated to number over 1,500,000. The gray bat's range overlaps...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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