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Latest Indicator bacteria Stories

Toxic E. Coli Fares Better Than Its Benign Counterparts
2013-06-13 16:13:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from Mercyhurst University and the University at Buffalo recently suggested that current testing methods for E. coli in lakes and rivers are insufficient. According to the scientists report in the journal“¯Applied and Environmental Microbiology, E. coli that produce a particular toxin are able to fend off predators and survive longer in lake water than their more benign counterparts. “The take-home lesson...

2012-06-16 01:00:43

Ongoing research by Mercyhurst University biologists intended to expand and expedite testing for potential pathogens in beach water at Presque Isle State Park has resulted in a new method that delivers near real-time water quality results. Mercyhurst biologist Dr. Steven Mauro, who has been instrumental in local beach water research the past five years, said the system is being piloted at Presque Isle this summer and represents a collaboration of Mercyhurst, Penn State Behrend, the...

2011-01-14 18:58:12

Laser sheds light on tracking source of microbial contamination on beach A simple, automated method of tracking E. coli uses a laser to detect and monitor the microbe in potentially contaminated bodies of water or waterways. The technique described this month in the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design could reduce the incidence of waterborne disease outbreaks. Microbial contamination of water is a worldwide environmental and health problem. Water related diseases...

2010-05-19 14:12:20

UT professor finds concentrations of viruses and bacteria linked to human feces in community water sources in East Tennessee Do you know what is in your drinking water? A study by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, professor may have you thinking twice the next time you fill up that glass of tap water. Larry McKay, an earth and planetary sciences professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, sampled eight community water supply sources in East Tennessee and found concentrations of viruses...

2009-09-23 07:11:15

Unexpected research findings show resource managers and researchers may have to rethink how they determine if water will make people sick. Bacteria commonly used to indicate health risks in recreational waters might not be so reliable after all. Pathogenic E. coli were pervasive in stream-water samples with low concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria. This is one of the unexpected findings from recent research that may affect how researchers and resource managers rely on indicator...

2008-09-12 15:05:00

Beach sand often contains higher levels of E.coli and other fecal bacteria than water at the beach, U.S researchers said. The U.S. Geological Survey said research suggests beach closings due to elevated fecal indicator bacteria may be linked to contaminated beach sand. The findings are among the topics that will be discussed in Indiana at the Great Lakes Beach Association conference Sept. 16-17. "Over the last few years, we've identified an important source of indicator bacteria and how...

2008-09-05 21:00:07

By Julia Scott PRINCETON-BY-THE-SEA -- The sun-dappled waters of Pillar Point Harbor look bright and beautiful on a hot afternoon, but the bacteria that lies below the surface is as much of a mystery as where it's coming from. County Environmental Health officials have known for years that the inner harbor's waters contain dangerously high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. It accumulates on Capistrano Beach, leading the county to post a permanent warning sign to keep visitors away....

2008-08-17 12:00:19

By Brenda Duran LONG BEACH - Officials will continue to keep nearly four miles of beach closed following test results that showed elevated bacteria levels after a sewage spill earlier this week. On Tuesday, a sewage spill of more than 20,000 gallons was caused by a broken sewer line near Watts that flowed down the Los Angeles River from Compton Creek and affected the beach from Alamitos Avenue to 72nd Place, according to the city. Helene Calvet, the city's health officer, said...

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2007-09-12 09:00:00

By Suzanne Bohan Here's a term you may start to hear more often: sand pollution. No one knows exactly what's causing it, but scientists do know that beaches often contain high levels of bacteria linked to the presence of harmful pathogens. Along the California coast, the majority of 55 beaches tested had detectable levels of these bacterial warning flags, enterococci and E. coli, according to a recent study from a Stanford University research team. Ninety-one percent of the beaches tested...

2007-08-13 18:15:36

The same microbes that result in U.S. beach closures and health advisories when detected at unsafe levels in the ocean are also detected in the sand. Alexandria Boehm, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University and graduate students Kevan Yamahara, Blythe Layton and Alyson Santoro collected samples of sand at 55 beaches between Mexico and Oregon and tested for fecal indicator bacteria in the lab and out in the field. The study, published in the...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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