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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 15:23 EDT

Latest Indri Stories

2009-05-27 09:13:49

Madagascar, where natural environments show a high level of endemism, is one of the last great biodiversity sanctuaries in the world. The island is home to a special group of primates, the lemurs. There are presently 15 genera and 71 species of these small mammals on Madagascar. The genus Palaeopropithecus is a group of subfossil giant lemurs (2). Up until now, two species had been described: P. ingens (in 1898) and P. maximus (in 1903). Palaeopropithecus have very specific adaptations,...

2005-06-06 22:56:57

New Haven, Conn.--Yale biologists have managed to extract and analyze DNA from giant, extinct lemurs, according to a Yale study published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Radiocarbon dating of the bones and teeth from which the DNA was obtained reveal that each of the individuals analyzed died well over 1,000 years ago, according to the senior author, Anne Yoder, associate professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Living lemurs...


Latest Indri Reference Libraries

Indri, Indri indri
2012-06-04 20:38:31

The indri (Indri indri) is also commonly known as the babakoto. It is related to the sifakas, and as with all lemurs, is native to the island of Madagascar. The range of this lemur begins along the eastern shores of Madagascar, from the Réserve Spéciale d’Anjanaharibe-Sud south to the Mangoro River. However, its range does not extend through the Marojejy National Park or the Masoala Peninsula, although these areas do connect to forests where indris reside 24 miles away. It is thought...

42_45a0d86bff61a798e72dd55715150ac0
2007-06-25 09:33:01

Verreaux's Sifaka, Propithecus verreauxi, is a medium-sized primate in the lemur family Indriidae. It lives in Madagascar and can be found in a variety of habitats from rain forest to western Madagascar dry deciduous forests and dry and spiny forests. The fur is thick and silky and generally white with brown on the sides, top of the head, and on the arms. Like all sifakas, it has a long tail that it uses as a balance when leaping from tree to tree. However, its body is so highly adapted to...

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