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Latest Indus Stories

Ancient Megacities Were Displaced Due To A Changing Climate: Study
2014-02-26 13:52:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Bronze Age Indus civilization, which spanned across northwest India and Pakistan, flourished for thousands of years and mysteriously declined as some type of development forced these ancient people to abandon the mega-cities they had constructed. A newly published paper in the journal Geology has asserted that climate change may be behind this abrupt change in the Indus way of life. "We think that we now have a really strong...

Climate Change Responsible For Indus Decline
2012-05-29 13:01:31

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com New research has shed a light on an ancient Asian civilization and given a glimpse into what the future might hold for the region. Climate change is now thought to be responsible for the decline of the Indus civilization, an empire that stretched over more than a million square kilometers. One of the first great urban cultures that also included Egypt and Mesopotamia, its people lived primarily along rivers from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges, over what is...

2011-07-05 09:17:00

'S-HERTOGENBOSCH, Netherlands, July 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- SAP User Group Executive Network (SUGEN) recently has expanded with two new members. They are the African SAP User Group AFSUG and the Indian user group INDUS. SUGEN is a global network of fifteen independent SAP user groups. They work together and are discussion partner of SAP for strategic subjects that are important for SAP customers. The number of SUGEN members increases to fifteen with the addition of the SAP user groups...

2009-08-03 16:57:50

The team led by a University of Washington researcher has used computers to extract patterns in ancient Indus symbols. The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows distinct patterns in the symbols' placement in sequences and creates a statistical model for the unknown language."The statistical model provides insights into the underlying grammatical structure of the Indus script," said lead author Rajesh Rao, a UW associate professor of computer...

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2009-04-24 08:31:21

The Rosetta Stone allowed 19th century scholars to translate symbols left by an ancient civilization and thus decipher the meaning of Egyptian hieroglyphics. But the symbols found on many other ancient artifacts remain a mystery, including those of a people that inhabited the Indus valley on the present-day border between Pakistan and India. Some experts question whether the symbols represent a language at all, or are merely pictograms that bear no relation to the language spoken by their...

2006-06-07 05:00:00

By Robert Birsel ISLAMABAD -- The highly endangered Indus river dolphin has dramatically increased in numbers in a small section of the Indus in Pakistan but the animals remain very rare and in grave danger, a scientist said on Wednesday. The unique, blind dolphin is one of the world's four freshwater dolphin species, and one of its rarest mammals. While the animals once thrived from the lower Indus up to the foothills of the Himalayas, its range has shrunk to just 20 percent of that, British...


Latest Indus Reference Libraries

42_4baf6c1873e1086ddd4dff6f4c96bc60
2006-09-01 13:04:41

The Ganges River Dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica) and Indus River Dolphin (Platanista gangetica minor) are two sub-species of freshwater or river dolphins found in India and Pakistan. From the 1970s they had commonly been regarded as separate species. The Ganges River Dolphin is primarily found in River Ganges and its tributaries in India while the Indus River Dolphin is found in the Indus river in Pakistan Taxonomy Until the 1970s the Indus and Ganges River Dolphins were...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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