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Latest Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research Stories

2013-07-31 10:47:27

The latest episode in the American Chemical Society's (ACS') award-winning Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions podcast series describes a report demonstrating that unprocessed, raw cotton has an amazing ability to sop up oil while also being eco-friendly. Based on a report by Seshadri Ramkumar, Ph.D., in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, the new podcast is available without charge at iTunes and from http://www.acs.org/globalchallenges. In light of the...

2012-07-12 10:37:29

Scientists are reporting new evidence that a white rot fungus shows promise in the search for a way to use waste corn stalks, cobs and leaves — rather than corn itself — to produce ethanol to extend supplies of gasoline. Their study on using the fungus to break down the tough cellulose and related material in this so-called "corn stover" to free up sugars for ethanol fermentation appears in the ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Yebo Li and colleagues...

2012-04-18 21:09:27

Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of a way to reuse – hundreds of times – the expensive, dirt-busting enzymes that boost the cleaning power of laundry detergents and powdered bleaches that now disappear down the drain. The discovery, reported in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, opens the door to new laundry products, like special scrub brushes or reusable enzyme-coated plastic flakes and strips that might be added to...

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2011-08-17 13:40:00

Alligator fat as a new source of biodiesel fuel Amid growing concern that using soybeans and other food crops to produce biodiesel fuel will raise the price of food, scientists have identified a new and unlikely raw material for the fuel: Alligator fat. Their report documenting gator fat's suitability for biofuel production appears in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Rakesh Bajpai and colleagues note that most of the 700 million gallons of biodiesel produced...

2011-03-09 14:55:06

To the surprisingly inventive uses for banana peels "” which include polishing silverware, leather shoes, and the leaves of house plants "” scientists have added purification of drinking water contaminated with potentially toxic metals. Their report, which concludes that minced banana peel performs better than an array of other purification materials, appears in ACS's journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Gustavo Castro and colleagues note that mining processes,...

2010-10-27 20:28:30

Tobacco, used on a small scale as a natural organic pesticide for hundreds of years, is getting new scientific attention as a potential mass-produced alternative to traditional commercial pesticides. That's the topic of a report in ACS' bi-weekly journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Cedric Briens and colleagues note that concerns about the health risks of tobacco have reduced demand and hurt tobacco farmers in some parts of the world. Scientists are looking for new uses...


Latest Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research Reference Libraries

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
2012-04-29 20:44:26

Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (I&EC Research) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published since 1909. It was published under Industrial & Engineering Chemistry until 1970, when Research was added to the title. The journal was edited by Milton C. Whitaker from 1911-1916. The journal’s current editor-in-chief is Professor Donald R. Paul. For industrial chemists and chemical engineers, this journal is the reliable and current source of new fundamental research,...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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