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Latest Inequality in disease Stories

2014-05-27 12:26:16

Wiley A new analysis has found that certain cancers are more concentrated in areas with high poverty, while other cancers arise more often in wealthy regions. Also, areas with higher poverty had lower cancer incidence and higher mortality than areas with lower poverty. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study's findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of socioeconomic status in national cancer surveillance efforts....

2012-08-23 00:34:12

Being overweight is the most important single contributing factor The authors say further efforts to tackle these risk factors, particularly excess weight, among disadvantaged groups are urgently needed. The burden of type 2 diabetes disproportionally affects the lower socioeconomic groups in society. Lifestyle related risk factors are thought to play a key role, but previous studies have tended to underestimate their effect. So an international team of researchers set out to measure...

2011-02-01 16:07:29

New American Cancer Society report details progress and challenges While the overall death rate for cancer continues to drop among African Americans, the group continues to have higher death rates and shorter survival of any racial and ethnic group in the U.S. for most cancers. The findings come from Cancer Facts & Figures for African Americans 2011-2012, the latest edition of a report produced every two years by the American Cancer Society. The higher overall cancer death rate among...

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2008-07-10 07:00:00

Researchers found that recent reductions in cancer death rates in the United States were largely tied to the patient's amount of education. The study was published Tuesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. It illustrated how a person's health can be closely related to socioeconomic factors such as education and income level. Researchers found that reductions in death rates from the four leading types of cancer in the United States have been largely driven since the early 1990s...

2006-08-24 12:24:01

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Less educated women face a greater risk of developing heart disease, research from Sweden shows. This is largely because women with fewer years of schooling are more likely to have heart disease risk factors such as cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high body mass index, high blood pressure and diabetes, researchers report. There is a well-established link between lower socioeconomic status and higher heart disease risk among men, the research team...

2006-01-06 12:23:10

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The economic situation of people's neighborhoods may affect their risk of suffering a heart attack, a study in Sweden suggests. Researchers found that among 3,610 adults living near the urban area of Stockholm, those living in lower-income neighborhoods had a higher rate of heart attack than those in more affluent areas. And the risk was not fully explained by a person's own income, education and occupation - factors that many studies have linked to...

2005-10-06 15:01:52

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a study of more than 250,000 women living in 35 metropolitan areas in the US, low income was associated with a decreased likelihood of being screened for breast cancer. Also, among women with low incomes, those living in more affluent areas are less likely to undergo breast cancer screening than their counterparts living in less affluent areas. The reasons for this, the investigators say, are unclear and require further study. The findings, which...

2005-06-23 19:50:00

Unknown factors not linked to diet, smoking or poverty may make Scots people more prone to heart disease, research led by University of Edinburgh has revealed. The findings, which are published in the current edition of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, conclude that although successful campaigns to get Scots to live a healthier lifestyle will reduce rates of heart disease in Scotland, they will not do much to narrow the gap in heart disease rates between Scotland and England....


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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