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Plants Respond To Sounds Caused By Chewing Caterpillars

Plants Respond To Sounds Caused By Chewing Caterpillars

[ Watch The Video: Plants Respond To Leaf Vibrations Caused By Insects’ Chewing ] University of Missouri-Columbia Previous studies have suggested that plant growth can be influenced by sound and that plants respond to wind and touch....

Latest Insect Stories

2014-07-10 12:31:41

USDA The spread of damaging invasive forest pests is only partially powered by the insects’ own wings. People moving firewood for camping can hasten and widen the insects’ spread and resulting forest destruction. A new U.S. Forest Service study gives state planners a tool for anticipating the most likely route of human-assisted spread they can use to enhance survey and public education efforts. The study, “Using a Network Model to Assess Risk of Forest Pest Spread via...

2014-06-27 12:22:47

CHICAGO, June 27, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As the human population grows, it is critical that the drain on the planet's resources be lessened by decreasing consumption of animal protein. According to two panel discussions on June 23 and 24 at the 2014 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo® in New Orleans, insects are a promising, economically viable alternative source of high quality protein that leave a substantially smaller environmental...

A Master Of Disguise: New Stick Insect Species Discovered In China
2014-06-02 03:47:34

Pensoft Publishers Many representatives of the fauna possess unique masking abilities but stick insects are among the masters of disguise within the animal world. During a field trip in Guangxi, China Mr. Ho Wai-chun George from the Hong Kong Entomological Society discovers a new species from this enigmatic insect group, which he describes in a recent research paper published in the open access journal Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift. Like the name suggests the new stick insect...

Light-colored Insects Thriving As European Climate Warms
2014-05-27 03:21:20

University of Copenhagen Butterflies and dragonflies with a lighter shade of color do better in warmer areas of Europe. This gives them a competitive advantage over the darker insects in the face of climate change. Changes in Europe's insect assemblages due to warming can already be seen for dragonflies, shows a study recently published in Nature Communications. "When studying biodiversity, we lack general rules about why certain species occur where they do. With this research we've...

Insects Are Potential Tool For Global Food Security
2014-05-21 03:05:24

Wageningen University The potential of insects as human food and animal feed to assure global food security and availability of animal proteins in a sustainable way has been the main focus of the first conference Insects to feed the world in the Netherlands. The main observation is that insects as food and feed receive ample attention and that developments are fast. Several major investments in the sector were announced during the conference. The topic is intensively discussed by...

Leaf Chewing Links Insect Diversity In Tropical Forests
2014-05-05 03:53:42

By A'ndrea Elyse Messer, Penn State Observations of insects and their feeding marks on leaves in modern forests confirm indications from fossil leaf deposits that the diversity of chewing damage relates directly to diversity of the insect population that created it, according to an international team of researchers. "The direct link between richness of leaf-chewing insects and their feeding damage across host plants in two tropical forests validates the underlying assumptions of many...

Some Wasps Developed Bigger Eyes To See Social Cues Better
2014-04-30 03:57:42

Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley Social communication drove evolution of larger facets in acute zone of compound eye Some wasps have developed bigger eyes, and thus better vision, to read the social cues written on the faces of their sister wasps, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study. "The Big Bad Wolf had it right," said lead author Michael Sheehan, a UC Berkeley postdoctoral fellow. "When Little Red Riding Hood said, 'Goodness, what big...

Digitizing Insects In 3-D Using 'Off-the-shelf' Equipment
2014-04-25 03:41:52

PLOS 3-D model insects useful for studying, sharing specimens Scientists have developed a cost-effective, off-the-shelf system to obtain natural-color 3D models of insects, according to results published April 23, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Chuong Nguyen from CSIRO in Australia, and colleagues. Scientists studying insects rely on collected specimens that are often shared between scientists through written descriptions, diagrams, and images. These 2D tools are...

Researchers Discover Cave Insects With Sex-reversed Genitalia
2014-04-18 09:04:10

Cell Press Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species in the genus Neotrogla, are the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. "Although sex-role reversal has been identified in several different animals, Neotrogla is the only example in which the intromittent organ is also reversed," says Kazunori...

2014-04-15 23:10:21

Insect Shield blankets offer invisible, odorless protection from a variety of insects that can carry Lyme disease, West Nile virus, malaria and other insect-borne diseases. Greensboro, NC & Seattle, WA (PRWEB) April 15, 2014 Spring is here which means the bugs are on their way... It is time to get ready for the annual battle against Spring/Summer insects. According to the CDC, Lyme disease has become an epidemic - and not just in the Northeast. More than 300,000 cases of Lyme are...


Latest Insect Reference Libraries

Tetragnatha extensa
2013-10-09 13:17:36

Tetragnatha extensa is a species of spider found across the Northern Hemisphere. It has an elongate body, up to .43 inches long, and assumes a straight line posture when it is alarmed. It lives on low vegetation in damp areas and consumes flying insects which it catches in its web. This spider has a stretched out, cream colored body. The males are smaller than the females at around .35 inches body length, compared to .43 inches in the females. The four pairs of legs are long and a dark...

Yellow-tipped Tigertail, Choristhemis flavoterminata
2013-07-30 13:52:06

The yellow-tipped tigertail (Choristhemis flavoterminata) is species of dragonfly that is native to Queensland, Australia. This species prefers to reside in warm, moist habitats near bodies of water like rivers. The yellow-tipped tigertail reaches an average body length of 1.8 inches and holds a long, thin abdomen. The end of the body holds a bright yellow spot and the wings are light brown in color with a brown spot. Larvae are described as slightly hairy and are light brown or gray in...

Wandering Glider, Pantala flavescens
2013-07-24 12:28:15

The wandering glider (Pantala flavescens), also known as the globe skimmer, is a species of dragonfly that can be found in a large range that includes Easter Island and Europe, although it is rare here, but it typically occurs in tropical and subtropical areas as well as cooler areas like Northern Canada, depending upon the season. This species has been recorded flying at heights of 20,341 feet in the Himalayas, higher than any other dragonfly species. The wandering glider reaches an...

Gray Sanddragon, Progomphus borealis
2013-07-11 13:32:30

The gray sanddragon (Progomphus borealis) is a species of dragonfly that can be found in many areas including Arizona, California, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. This species prefers a habitat near streams and rivers in desert climates. It is typically seen between the months of June and September, but it can also be seen between April and October. Adult gray sanddragons reach an average body length between 2.2 and 2.4 inches, while its nymphs or larvae...

Giant Centipede, Ethmostigmus rubripes
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: I took this picture myself on 7th March, 2007. John E. Hill 04:23, 7 March 2007 (UTC) Specimen caught by Jim Symes in Laura, Queensland. It measures over 16 cm from its' head to the end of its' body and is the largest recorded specimen of this species so far. John E. Hill 11:12, 22 March 2007 (UTC). Credit: John E. Hill/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The giant centipede (Ethmostigmus rubripes) can be found in Australia, Indonesia, New Guinea, China, Southeast Asia, and the...

More Articles (18 articles) »
Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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