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Latest Insect Stories

Researchers Discover Cave Insects With Sex-reversed Genitalia
2014-04-18 09:04:10

Cell Press Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species in the genus Neotrogla, are the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. "Although sex-role reversal has been identified in several different animals, Neotrogla is the only example in which the intromittent organ is also reversed," says Kazunori...

2014-04-15 23:10:21

Insect Shield blankets offer invisible, odorless protection from a variety of insects that can carry Lyme disease, West Nile virus, malaria and other insect-borne diseases. Greensboro, NC & Seattle, WA (PRWEB) April 15, 2014 Spring is here which means the bugs are on their way... It is time to get ready for the annual battle against Spring/Summer insects. According to the CDC, Lyme disease has become an epidemic - and not just in the Northeast. More than 300,000 cases of Lyme are...

Fruit Flies Use Not Just Eyes, But Antennae To Control Air Speed
2014-04-11 14:20:00

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geneticists may know the fruit fly genus Drosophila as go-to organisms for their research, but a new study focused instead on how these insects go into a sort of “cruise control” while in flight. Using bursts of air and sophisticated software, the new study revealed that fruit flies use a combination of vision and their wind-sensitive antennae to maintain a constant flight speed relative to the ground. The new study, published in...

Attracting Or Repelling Insects Using Different Scents
2014-04-01 15:48:26

University of Zurich Flowering plants attract pollinating insects with scent from their flowers and bright colors. If they have become infested with herbivores like caterpillars, they attract beneficial insects like parasitic wasps with the help of scent signals from their leaves. The wasps then lay their eggs in the caterpillars and kill the parasites. Floral and foliar scents can, however, mutually reduce their attractiveness. That's why flowering plants face a dilemma: should they use...

3D Movie From Inside Live Flying Insects
2014-03-31 09:11:47

[ Watch The Video: Three-Dimensional Visualization of the Insect Thorax ] University of Oxford The flight muscles moving inside flies have been filmed for the first time using a new 3D X-ray scanning technique. 3D movies of the muscles were created by a team from Oxford University, Imperial College London, and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), using the PSI's Swiss Light Source, a powerful X-ray source. The movies offer a glimpse into the inner workings of one of nature's most...

Earliest Stick Insect Fossils Discovered
2014-03-20 08:06:36

PLOS Wing shape and coloration pattern suggest plant-mimicking stick insects from the Early Cretaceous An ancient stick insect species may have mimicked plant leaves for defense, according to a paper published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 19, 2014 by Maomin Wang, from Capital Normal University, China and colleagues. Many insects have developed defense mechanisms, including the ability to mimic the surrounding environment. Stick and leaf insects mimic plants from...

Specialization By Insect Species Is The Key
2014-03-14 14:54:57

University of Iowa Most of us already imagine the tropics as a place of diversity—a lush region of the globe teeming with a wide variety of exotic plants and animals. But for researchers Andrew Forbes and Marty Condon, there's even more diversity than meets the eye. In a paper published in the March 14 issue of the journal Science, Forbes and Condon report the discovery of extraordinary diversity and specialization in the tropics. The paper builds upon previous research conducted...

Researchers Use Plant-produced Sex Pheromone To Trap Moths
2014-02-27 14:24:45

Kansas State University A collaborative experiment involving a Kansas State University biochemist may mark the beginning of an effective, environmentally friendly plant-based method of insect control. Timothy Durrett, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics, was part of the collaboration that used various plant and moth enzymes to engineer plants that emitted sex pheromones that mimic those naturally produced by two species of moths. The research recently...

Road Map And Dictionary For The Arthropod Brain
2014-02-27 12:39:42

Daniel Stolte, University of Arizona By providing a standardized nomenclature for the architecture of insect brains, UA neuroscientists will help improve studies of human brain function and disease When you're talking about something as complex as the brain, the task isn't any easier if the vocabulary being used is just as complex. An international collaboration of neuroscientists has not only tripled the number of identified brain structures, but created a simple lexicon to talk about...

How Stick Insects Harness Friction To Grip Without Sticking
2014-02-19 11:18:56

University of Cambridge When they’re not hanging upside down, stick insects don’t need to stick. In fact, when moving upright, sticking would be a hindrance: so much extra effort is required to ‘unstick’ again with every step. Latest research from Cambridge’s Department of Zoology shows that stick insects have specialized pads on their legs designed to produce large amounts of friction with very little pressure. When upright, stick insects aren’t sticking at all, but...


Latest Insect Reference Libraries

Tetragnatha extensa
2013-10-09 13:17:36

Tetragnatha extensa is a species of spider found across the Northern Hemisphere. It has an elongate body, up to .43 inches long, and assumes a straight line posture when it is alarmed. It lives on low vegetation in damp areas and consumes flying insects which it catches in its web. This spider has a stretched out, cream colored body. The males are smaller than the females at around .35 inches body length, compared to .43 inches in the females. The four pairs of legs are long and a dark...

Yellow-tipped Tigertail, Choristhemis flavoterminata
2013-07-30 13:52:06

The yellow-tipped tigertail (Choristhemis flavoterminata) is species of dragonfly that is native to Queensland, Australia. This species prefers to reside in warm, moist habitats near bodies of water like rivers. The yellow-tipped tigertail reaches an average body length of 1.8 inches and holds a long, thin abdomen. The end of the body holds a bright yellow spot and the wings are light brown in color with a brown spot. Larvae are described as slightly hairy and are light brown or gray in...

Wandering Glider, Pantala flavescens
2013-07-24 12:28:15

The wandering glider (Pantala flavescens), also known as the globe skimmer, is a species of dragonfly that can be found in a large range that includes Easter Island and Europe, although it is rare here, but it typically occurs in tropical and subtropical areas as well as cooler areas like Northern Canada, depending upon the season. This species has been recorded flying at heights of 20,341 feet in the Himalayas, higher than any other dragonfly species. The wandering glider reaches an...

Gray Sanddragon, Progomphus borealis
2013-07-11 13:32:30

The gray sanddragon (Progomphus borealis) is a species of dragonfly that can be found in many areas including Arizona, California, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. This species prefers a habitat near streams and rivers in desert climates. It is typically seen between the months of June and September, but it can also be seen between April and October. Adult gray sanddragons reach an average body length between 2.2 and 2.4 inches, while its nymphs or larvae...

Giant Centipede, Ethmostigmus rubripes
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: I took this picture myself on 7th March, 2007. John E. Hill 04:23, 7 March 2007 (UTC) Specimen caught by Jim Symes in Laura, Queensland. It measures over 16 cm from its' head to the end of its' body and is the largest recorded specimen of this species so far. John E. Hill 11:12, 22 March 2007 (UTC). Credit: John E. Hill/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The giant centipede (Ethmostigmus rubripes) can be found in Australia, Indonesia, New Guinea, China, Southeast Asia, and the...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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