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Latest Insect Stories

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2009-07-28 16:05:00

Armored crickets have a strange yet remarkable way of defending themselves from being attacked, squirting out toxic blood from tiny gaps in their body and then throwing up to make themselves unpalatable to predators.While a few other insect species, such as beetles and katydids, actively bleed when attacked, the benefits of such extreme measures were not clear. New research shows the strategy does indeed work in deterring predators such as lizards.  Armored ground crickets (Acanthoplus...

2009-07-23 19:01:58

Extreme wet weather in some parts of the United States has caused an increase in mosquitoes and their bites, which can cause disease like West Nile. David Mizejewski of the National Wildlife Federation says since the pesky biters start life out as aquatic larvae in standing bodies of water -- as little as one-inch of water -- it's best to get rid of hot beds for mosquito reproduction. These include clogged gutters, flower-pot drainage dishes, play equipment, tarps and debris. A birth bath...

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2009-07-15 09:35:00

After 10 years of biochemical and molecular analysis of the Tyrrhenoleuctra plecoptera that live in the Western Mediterranean, Spanish and Italian scientists have now demonstrated that one of the insect populations of this group is a distinct and, therefore, new species.The researchers, including a team from the University of Granada (UGR), used biochemical and molecular techniques for a decade to detail the taxonomical and phylogenetic relationships of the insects of the Tyrrhenoleuctra...

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2009-07-14 13:10:00

Japanese scientists are involved in groundbreaking research to understand and then rebuild the brains of insects and program them for specific tasks, AFP reported. After studying insect brains for three decades, Ryohei Kanzaki, a professor at Tokyo University's Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, has become a pioneer in the field of insect-machine hybrids. Kanzaki has been studying insects' "micro-brains" in order to move closer to his original and ultimate goal of...

2009-07-08 14:36:36

A U.S. study shows not all insects have rigid wings, with some insects, such as moths, having wings that flex and deform during flight. University of Washington researchers said most scientists who study the mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight have assumed insect wings are relatively rigid as they flap. But the researchers in the new study, led by biology Professor Thomas Daniel, used high-speed digital imaging to show some insects' wings flex and deform while in flight. The evidence...

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2009-07-06 15:10:00

 A University of California, Berkeley, project to catalog nearly every living thing on the Polynesian island of Moorea is enlisting the help of the island's 5th graders and showing them that science is not for foreigners only.While conducting research for his thesis and for the Moorea Biocode Project, UC Berkeley graduate student Brad Balukjian has been teaching 5th graders at the Paopao Primary School about biodiversity and introducing them to the scientific study of the plants and...

2009-06-30 09:52:58

Many plants protect themselves from hungry animals by producing toxic chemicals. In turn, animals rely on detecting the presence of these harmful chemicals to avoid consuming dangerous plant material. A paper, published in this week's issue of PLoS Biology, investigates the response of an insect to a common plant weapon "“ the toxin L-canavanine. The work, from authors at the Institute of Functional Genomic of Montpellier, finds that the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster can recognize...

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2009-06-29 17:00:00

Most scientists who create models trying to understand the mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight have assumed that insect wings are relatively rigid as they flap.New University of Washington research using high-speed digital imaging shows that, at least for some insects, wings that flex and deform, something like what happens to a heavy beach towel when you snap it to get rid of the sand, are the best for staying aloft."The evidence indicates that flexible wings are producing profoundly...

2009-06-08 14:20:33

Harvard University scientists have determined some bees brace themselves against wind and turbulence by extending their hind legs while flying. Wind is a universal part of life for all flying animals, Assistant Professor Stacey Combes said. Yet we know remarkably little about how animals navigate windy conditions and unpredictable airflows, since most studies of animal flight have taken place in simplified environments, such as in still air or perfect laminar flows. Combes and Robert Dudley...

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2009-06-02 13:56:41

Turbulence hampers flight for various bee species, and possibly other insects New research shows some bees brace themselves against wind and turbulence by extending their sturdy hind legs while flying. But this approach comes at a steep cost, increasing aerodynamic drag and the power required for flight by roughly 30 percent, and cutting into the bees' flight performance. The findings are detailed in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Wind is a universal part of life for...


Latest Insect Reference Libraries

Tetragnatha extensa
2013-10-09 13:17:36

Tetragnatha extensa is a species of spider found across the Northern Hemisphere. It has an elongate body, up to .43 inches long, and assumes a straight line posture when it is alarmed. It lives on low vegetation in damp areas and consumes flying insects which it catches in its web. This spider has a stretched out, cream colored body. The males are smaller than the females at around .35 inches body length, compared to .43 inches in the females. The four pairs of legs are long and a dark...

Yellow-tipped Tigertail, Choristhemis flavoterminata
2013-07-30 13:52:06

The yellow-tipped tigertail (Choristhemis flavoterminata) is species of dragonfly that is native to Queensland, Australia. This species prefers to reside in warm, moist habitats near bodies of water like rivers. The yellow-tipped tigertail reaches an average body length of 1.8 inches and holds a long, thin abdomen. The end of the body holds a bright yellow spot and the wings are light brown in color with a brown spot. Larvae are described as slightly hairy and are light brown or gray in...

Wandering Glider, Pantala flavescens
2013-07-24 12:28:15

The wandering glider (Pantala flavescens), also known as the globe skimmer, is a species of dragonfly that can be found in a large range that includes Easter Island and Europe, although it is rare here, but it typically occurs in tropical and subtropical areas as well as cooler areas like Northern Canada, depending upon the season. This species has been recorded flying at heights of 20,341 feet in the Himalayas, higher than any other dragonfly species. The wandering glider reaches an...

Gray Sanddragon, Progomphus borealis
2013-07-11 13:32:30

The gray sanddragon (Progomphus borealis) is a species of dragonfly that can be found in many areas including Arizona, California, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. This species prefers a habitat near streams and rivers in desert climates. It is typically seen between the months of June and September, but it can also be seen between April and October. Adult gray sanddragons reach an average body length between 2.2 and 2.4 inches, while its nymphs or larvae...

Giant Centipede, Ethmostigmus rubripes
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Image Caption: I took this picture myself on 7th March, 2007. John E. Hill 04:23, 7 March 2007 (UTC) Specimen caught by Jim Symes in Laura, Queensland. It measures over 16 cm from its' head to the end of its' body and is the largest recorded specimen of this species so far. John E. Hill 11:12, 22 March 2007 (UTC). Credit: John E. Hill/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The giant centipede (Ethmostigmus rubripes) can be found in Australia, Indonesia, New Guinea, China, Southeast Asia, and the...

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