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Latest Insular cortex Stories

2013-06-18 15:23:03

A study, led by Royal Holloway University researcher Carolyn McGettigan, has identified the brain regions and interactions involved in impersonations and accents. Using an fMRI scanner, the team asked participants, all non-professional impressionists, to repeatedly recite the opening lines of a familiar nursery rhyme either with their normal voice, by impersonating individuals, or by impersonating regional and foreign accents of English. They found that when a voice is deliberately...

2013-02-14 13:29:27

A team of political scientists and neuroscientists has shown that liberals and conservatives use different parts of the brain when they make risky decisions, and these regions can be used to predict which political party a person prefers. The new study suggests that while genetics or parental influence may play a significant role, being a Republican or Democrat changes how the brain functions. Dr. Darren Schreiber, a researcher in neuropolitics at the University of Exeter, has been working...

Pinocchio Effect Proven Through Thermography
2012-12-04 05:36:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A breakthrough new study from the University of Granada has confirmed that Geppetto was right when he told Pinocchio that lying affects your nose, he was just wrong about how. The new study reveals that when a person lies, they suffer a "Pinocchio effect" — an increase in the temperature around the nose and in the orbital muscle in the inner corner of the eye. They also found that when a person performs a considerable mental...

Math Can Really Hurt
2012-11-02 04:01:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some lucky people have a proclivity for number crunching and difficult equations, but for many of us the idea of performing complex calculations is more horrifying than a Friday the 13th movie marathon. And, like Jason Voorhees´ two-foot machete plunging into his victim´s abdomen – the personal anxiety surrounding an impending math exam can actually cause people to feel physical pain, according to new research from the...

Self-awareness In Humans Is More Intricate Than Previously Thought
2012-08-23 07:18:36

Ancient Greek philosophers considered the ability to "know thyself" as the pinnacle of humanity. Now, thousands of years later, neuroscientists are trying to decipher precisely how the human brain constructs our sense of self. Self-awareness is defined as being aware of oneself, including one's traits, feelings, and behaviors. Neuroscientists have believed that three brain regions are critical for self-awareness: the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the medial prefrontal...

Emotion To Vividness Of Perception Linked To Creation Of Vivid Memories
2012-08-20 13:41:57

Have you ever wondered why you can remember things from long ago as if they happened yesterday, yet sometimes can't recall what you ate for dinner last night? According to a new study led by psychologists at the University of Toronto, it's because how much something means to you actually influences how you see it as well as how vividly you can recall it later. "We've discovered that we see things that are emotionally arousing with greater clarity than those that are more mundane," says...

2012-06-20 19:11:59

Concordia research helps develop first brain map of love and desire Thanks to modern science, we know that love lives in the brain, not in the heart. But where in the brain is it — and is it in the same place as sexual desire? A recent international study is the first to draw an exact map of these intimately linked feelings. "No one has ever put these two together to see the patterns of activation," says Jim Pfaus, professor of psychology at Concordia University. "We didn't know...

2012-05-22 02:23:17

Max Planck scientists discover brain cells in monkeys that may be linked to self-awareness and empathy in humans The anterior insular cortex is a small brain region that plays a crucial role in human self-awareness and in related neuropsychiatric disorders. A unique cell type — the von Economo neuron (VEN) — is located there. For a long time, the VEN was assumed to be unique to humans, great apes, whales and elephants. Henry Evrard, neuroanatomist at the Max Planck Institute...

2012-04-10 09:01:48

The part of the brain we use when engaging in egalitarian behavior may also be linked to a larger sense of morality, researchers have found. Their conclusions, which offer scientific support for Adam Smith's theories of morality, are based on experimental research published in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, coming seven months after the start of the Occupy Wall Street Movement, which has been aimed at addressing income inequality, was...

2012-04-03 20:12:46

The brains of people with anorexia and obesity are wired differently, according to new research. Neuroscientists for the first time have found that how our brains respond to food differs across a spectrum of eating behaviors — from extreme overeating to food deprivation. This study is one of several new approaches to help better understand and ultimately treat eating disorders and obesity. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. And more than...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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