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Latest Insulin therapy Stories

2013-03-13 15:00:20

Polycystic ovary syndrome, a condition affecting about 10 percent of women and characterized by excess male hormone and increased risk of diabetes and heart disease, appears to cause a sort of double jeopardy for those struggling the hardest to control blood sugar levels, researchers report. Humans use insulin and other non-insulin mechanisms to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy and control levels in the blood, where it becomes a destructive force. A new study in the Journal...

Binge Drinking Raises Risk Of Developing  Type 2 Diabetes
2013-01-31 09:06:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Metabolism Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital´s Icahn School of Medicine led a new animal study showing that binge drinking causes insulin resistance which, in turn, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. The study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, also discovered that alcohol disrupts insulin-receptor signaling by causing inflammation in the hypothalamus. "Insulin resistance has...


Latest Insulin therapy Reference Libraries

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2010-12-03 18:12:26

Insulin, a hormone, is used to regulate carbohydrate and fat metabolism in the body. Insulin causes cells to take up glucose from the blood and store it as glycogen in the liver and muscle. This hormone stops the body from using fat as an energy source by inhibiting the release of glucagons. Without insulin the body fails to take glucose into the bodies cells and in turns uses fat as an energy source. It also has several other anabolic effects throughout the body. Diabetes mellitus results...

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Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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