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Latest Integral membrane proteins Stories

2011-08-01 14:28:39

Stress protection: How blue-green algae hoard energy Under normal conditions, cyanobacteria, also termed blue-green algae, build up energy reserves that allow them to survive under stress such as long periods of darkness. They do this by means of a molecular switch in an enzyme. By removing this switch, it should be possible to use the excess energy of the bacteria for biotechnological purposes such as hydrogen production, without the bacteria suffering. This was found out by researchers at...

2011-07-26 21:10:15

Penn researchers have helped develop a nanotech device that combines carbon nanotubes with olfactory receptor proteins, the cell components in the nose that detect odors. Because olfactory receptors belong to a larger class of proteins that are involved in passing signals through the cell membrane, these devices could have applications beyond odor sensing, such as pharmaceutical research.  The research was led by professor A. T. Charlie Johnson, postdoctoral fellow Brett R. Goldsmith...

2011-07-20 13:04:20

Inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease may be detectable as many as 20 years before problems with memory and thinking develop, scientists will report July 20, 2011, at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris. Identifying Alzheimer's in its earliest stages is a top priority for researchers. Many think that by the time symptoms become apparent, Alzheimer's disease has already damaged the brain extensively, making it difficult or impossible to restore...

2011-07-19 13:17:35

A single traumatic brain injury may prompt long-term neurodegeneration, Penn study shows Years after a single traumatic brain injury (TBI), survivors still show changes in their brains. In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest that Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration may be initiated or accelerated following a single traumatic brain injury, even in young adults. Over 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury...

2011-07-18 15:11:36

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified how a gene for a protein that can cause Type 2 diabetes, also possibly kills nerve cells in the brain, thereby contributing to Alzheimer's disease. The gene, called SorCS1, controls the generation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in the brain. Abeta plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers previously linked SorCS1 to Alzheimer's disease and identified where the molecules lived in the cell, but not how they...

2011-07-18 05:30:00

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., July 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Satori(TM) Pharmaceuticals today announced the presentation of two posters at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD) taking place in Paris, France, July 16-21, 2011. Both posters illuminate the unique biological activity associated with Satori's approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The posters were titled, "Gamma-secretase modulators do not show a potency shift in high expressing model...

2011-07-14 15:21:50

BK channels (large-conductance, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels) are essential for the regulation of important biological processes such as smooth muscle tone and neuronal excitability. New research shows that BK channel activation involves structural rearrangements formerly not understood. The study appears in the August 2011 issue of the Journal of General Physiology. Previous research pointed to a possible unified theory of activation gating in K+ channels, with the "activation gate" formed by...

2011-07-14 15:17:23

The human genome encodes 243 voltage-gated ion channels. Mutations in calcium channels can cause severe inherited diseases such as migraine, night blindness, autism spectrum disorders and Timothy syndrome, which leads to severe cardiovascular disorders. Katrin Depil and Anna Stary-Weinzinger together with colleagues from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Vienna analyzed changes in molecular organization of calcium channels caused by Timothy syndrome mutations....

2011-07-12 11:23:00

- Unique alliance unites FDA, academic scientists, pharma industry & Alzheimer's Association - CHICAGO, July 12, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New recommendations to protect participant safety in clinical trials of certain Alzheimer's disease drugs have been accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are already being incorporated into research studies. These safety recommendations address possible side effects of drugs aimed at a toxic protein called beta-amyloid...

2011-07-03 12:35:02

Highly aggregative and neurotoxic amyloid peptide Abeta43 points the way to new approaches for AD diagnosis and treatmentTokyo, July 4, 2011 - (ACN Newswire) - Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute (BSI) and their collaborators have shed light on the function of a little-studied amyloid peptide in promoting Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their surprising findings reveal that the peptide is more abundant, more neurotoxic, and exhibits a higher propensity to aggregate than amyloidogenic...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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