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Latest Integrin Stories

2014-07-02 10:59:23

Cornell University Every living cell's surface has a protein-embedded membrane that's covered in polysaccharide chains – a literal sugar coating. A new study by a Cornell University researcher found this coating is especially thick and pronounced on cancer cells and is a crucial determinant of the cell's survival. Consisting of long, sugar-decorated molecules called glycoproteins, the coating causes physical changes in the cell membrane that make the cell better able to thrive –...

2014-01-03 15:47:18

A protein that has been at the center of cancer drug design for the last 20 years should not be given up on according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The most advanced version of αvβ3-integrin antagonists failed clinical trials to treat aggressive forms of brain cancer. But research published today in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation Research shows that targeting the protein in question could still be vital in stopping the growth of...

2013-11-11 11:00:52

Uni of Edinburgh news release Patients with damaged organs could be helped by new treatments after scientists have discovered how tissues scar. Researchers say that the finding could pave the way for new drugs and eventually reduce the number of patients on organ transplant waiting lists. Fibrotic diseases occur in many tissues within the body – including the liver, lung or kidneys – and have a range of causes including viruses or toxins. Experts say that the main source of scar...

2013-11-11 10:28:31

Nature Medicine paper pinpoints where, how to intervene A team of scientists that includes Saint Louis University researchers has identified a new way to intervene in the molecular and cellular cascade that causes fibrosis – a condition where the body's natural process of forming scars for wound healing goes into overdrive and causes diseases. The findings, published Nov. 10 in the advance online issue of Nature Medicine, demonstrate a potential novel therapeutic approach to treat...

2013-09-26 17:51:35

Professor Hannes Lohi's research group at the University of Helsinki and Folkhälsan Research Center has identified a mutation in ITGA10 gene, causing chondrodysplasia in two dog breeds, the Norwegian Elkhound and the Karelian Bear Dog. The research revealed a new chondrodysplasia gene in dogs, and a candidate gene for human chondrodysplasias. The finding has implications on bone biology as well as canine health. A genetic test can now be used to identify mutation carriers in the two affected...

IntegrinMD
2013-03-22 16:03:48

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Your cells are social butterflies. They constantly interact with their surroundings, taking in cues on when to divide and where to anchor themselves, among other critical tasks. This networking is driven in part by proteins called integrin, which reside in a cell´s outer plasma membrane. Their job is to convert mechanical forces from outside the cell into internal chemical signals that tell the cell what to do. That is, when they work properly....

How Does Your Bladder Know When To Go?
2013-02-09 07:40:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions suffer from overactive bladder or incontinence, and now help might be on the way. A new study, led by Harvard Medical School, reveals that the epithelium, a thin layer of cells lining the surface of the bladder, is able to sense how full the bladder is through the action of a family of proteins called integrins. The cells of the epithelium stretch and become thinner as the bladder fills. This activates the integrins, causing...

2012-12-24 15:16:17

Scientists at The University of Manchester have identified how cells know which way up they need to be. The discovery could help in the fight against cancer because in the early stages of the disease the cells become disorganized. Professor Charles Streuli and Dr Nasreen Akhtar of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research have conducted new research that leads to a better understanding of cell polarity. Properly organized tissues are vital to maintaining functional organs and a...

Cancer Cells Break Away
2012-10-11 09:30:45

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has revealed that cancer cells break away from tumors via adhesion molecules, causing a spread of cancer throughout the body. The findings from the research project were recently published in the journal Nature Communications and offer a glimpse into the possible development of cancer drug targets. “As cancer cells become more metastatic, there can be a...

2012-02-22 11:03:02

When first exposed to cocaine, the adolescent brain launches a strong defensive reaction designed to minimize the drug's effects, Yale and other scientists have found. Now two new studies by a Yale team identify key genes that regulate this response and show that interfering with this reaction dramatically increases a mouse's sensitivity to cocaine. The findings may help explain why risk of drug abuse and addiction increase so dramatically when cocaine use begins during teenage years....


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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