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Latest Interdisciplinary fields Stories

2011-04-19 22:52:36

Jamie Tyler, assistant professor in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, has been invited to speak at a Royal Society of London high level workshop on May 11-12 on the security implications of advances in neuroscience. The workshop is part of a four-part policy study on neuroscience and society called Brain Waves. This third module, entitled Neuroscience, conflict and security...

2011-04-15 00:00:28

Gallaudet University announced today that Laura-Ann Petitto has been named science director and co-principal investigator of the university's Visual Language and Visual Learning Center (VL2), one of only six Science of Learning Centers in the country funded by the National Science Foundation. Washington, DC (PRWEB) April 14, 2011 Gallaudet University announced today that Laura-Ann Petitto has been named science director and co-principal investigator of the university's Visual Language and...

2011-03-23 20:30:04

A team of researchers has found that pursuing carefully planned goals and engaging in more automatic habits shows overlapping neurological mechanisms. Because the findings, which appear in the latest issue of the journal Neuron, show a neurological linkage between goal-directed and habitual, and perhaps damaging, behaviors, they may offer a pathway for beginning to address addiction and similar maladies. The study was conducted by researchers at New York University's Center for Neural Science...

2011-02-28 16:00:02

New York University researchers have isolated neural activity that reflects basic mechanisms used by the brain to combine elementary pieces of language in order to construct complex ideas. The study, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience, was conducted by Douglas Bemis, a graduate student in NYU's Department of Psychology, and Liina Pylkkänen, an associate professor in NYU's Department of Psychology and Department of Linguistics. Researchers have long studied the neural regions...

2011-02-08 13:29:14

The human brain operates as a highly interconnected small-world network, not as a collection of discrete regions as previously believed, with important implications for why many of us experience cognitive declines in old age, a new study shows. Australian researchers have mapped the brain's neural networks and for the first time linked them with specific cognitive functions, such as information processing and language. Results from the study are published in the prestigious Journal of...

2011-01-25 15:25:19

One of the first studies published from the University of Missouri Brain Imaging Center (BIC) gives researchers insight into the brain and memory and may provide researchers clues to treating a variety of debilitating disorders. Nelson Cowan, director of the BIC and Curator's Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, used the BIC's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce graphics that depict the structure and function of the brain during various mental tasks in an effort to...

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2011-01-19 14:27:27

TAU measures the human mind against the yardstick of a machine Although we're convinced that baby is brilliant when she mutters her first words, cognitive scientists have been conducting a decades-long debate about whether or not human beings actually "learn" language. Most theoretical linguists, including the noted researcher Noam Chomsky, argue that people have little more than a "language organ" "” an inherent capacity for language that's activated during early childhood. On the...

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2010-12-15 09:20:00

The brains of fighter pilots are significantly different from those of the average individual, claims a new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Neuroscience. Using a series of cognitive tests and MRI scans, researchers from University College London (UCL) studied 11 front-line Tornado fighter pilots from the Royal Air Force (RAF). Each of the pilots were asked to complete two "cognitive control" tasks centered around rapid decision making, and also had their brains scanned using a type...

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2010-12-09 07:02:01

By Yasmin Anwar, University of California, Berkeley Like the mute button on the TV remote control, our brains filter out unwanted noise so we can focus on what we're listening to. But when it comes to following our own speech, a new brain study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that instead of one homogenous mute button, we have a network of volume settings that can selectively silence and amplify the sounds we make and hear. Neuroscientists from UC Berkeley, UCSF and Johns...

2010-11-17 14:04:13

Research offers new insights into communication problems like stuttering New human and animal studies released today uncover the extensive brain wiring used in communication and provide new insights into how the brain processes and produces language, accents, and sounds. The research also explores the brain abnormalities in people with speech and language problems, such as stuttering, suggesting future treatment avenues. The new findings were presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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