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Latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Stories

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2009-02-26 13:38:11

As the impact of a global economic recession grows, many experts fear that rich nations may not set ambitious targets for cuts in greenhouse gas emissions. Developed nations have generally aimed toward a greenhouse gas reduction of 15 percent from current levels. However, scientists employed by the U.N. say a 15 percent goal will not suffice. "We're beginning to see a rough alignment for the numbers for developed countries," Elliot Diringer of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change in...

2009-02-25 11:55:00

 A new study by scientists updating some of the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2001 Third Assessment Report finds that even a lower level of increase in average global temperatures due to greenhouse gas emissions could cause significant problems in five key areas of global concern.The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is titled "Assessing Dangerous Climate Change Through an Update of the IPCC 'Reasons for...

2009-02-17 15:15:28

A U.S. scientist says Earth's atmospheric greenhouse gases are increasing more rapidly than expected, resulting in worsening global warming predictions. Chris Field, a member of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says decisive action is needed to prevent the planet's climate system from crossing a critical threshold by the end of the century. Field, director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, said studies indicate greenhouse warming...

2009-02-15 20:04:01

Earth is warming faster than scientists have predicted, in part because industrial greenhouse gas emissions have increased, U.S. scientists say. Scientists say higher temperatures are triggering responses in ecosystems, The Washington Post reported Sunday. We are basically looking now at a future climate that's beyond anything we've considered seriously in climate model simulations, said Christopher Field, founding director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology at...

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2009-02-15 07:45:00

According to a top climate scientist, warnings about global warming have not been severe enough. Just over a year ago, the Nobel-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued a report warning of expanding deserts, intense storms, rising sea levels, and an extinction of up to 30 percent of animals and plants due to global warming. A recent study suggests that the report underestimated the severity of climate change over the next century, says a senior member of the IPCC. "We...

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2009-01-19 07:40:00

According to researchers, Europe's temperatures have risen over the past 30 years due to fewer misty, hazy, and foggy days. The finding could help researchers predict future climate changes. Five to ten percent of the region's warmer temperatures can be attributed to clearer skies and less air pollution says Geert Jan van Oldenborgh, a scientist from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. "The temperatures in Europe have been going up twice as fast as climate models had predicted in...

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2009-01-17 14:05:00

The Environmental Protection Agency said on Friday rising seal levels on the United States' mid-Atlantic coast are happening faster than the global average because of global warming.The continued rise is threatening the future of coastal communities.The EPA released a report detailing coastal waters from New York to North Carolina have crept up by an average of 0.09 to 0.17 inches a year, compared with an average global increase of 0.07 inches a year.The report was commissioned by the Climate...

2009-01-16 09:00:00

WASHINGTON, Jan. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists need a more detailed understanding of how human-produced atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect climate in order to produce better predictions of Earth's future climate, according to a NASA-led report issued by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program on Friday. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) "Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts," is the latest in a series of Climate Change...

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2009-01-16 09:40:00

WASHINGTON -- Scientists need a more detailed understanding of how human-produced atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect climate in order to produce better predictions of Earth's future climate, according to a NASA-led report issued by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program on Friday. "Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts," is the latest in a series of Climate Change Science Program reports that addresses various aspects of the country's highest priority climate...

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2009-01-14 14:31:22

The Worldwatch Institute released a new report on Tuesday that advises sweeping changes must be made to limit global emissions by 2050. In its report, titled "State of the World 2009: Into A Warming World," authors say that even a small increase of up to 3.6 degrees F in global temperatures could result in dangerous threats to natural systems. In order to avoid these threats, the report says that world carbon emissions will have to drop to near zero by 2050 and "go negative" after that....


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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