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Latest Interpersonal relationships Stories

2012-08-21 23:36:48

It's not just in movies where nerds get their revenge. A study by a Johns Hopkins University business professor finds that social rejection can inspire imaginative thinking, particularly in individuals with a strong sense of their own independence. "For people who already feel separate from the crowd, social rejection can be a form of validation," says Johns Hopkins Carey Business School assistant professor Sharon Kim, the study's lead author. "Rejection confirms for independent people...

2012-08-03 01:07:41

It is not always best to forgive and forget in marriage, according to new research that looks at the costs of forgiveness. Sometimes expressing anger might be necessary to resolve a relationship problem — with the short-term discomfort of an angry but honest conversation benefiting the health of the relationship in the long-term. The research is part of a larger effort to better understand the contexts in which some relationships succeed and others fail, and also to understand how close...

2012-07-18 01:12:51

Intuitively it simply makes sense: exposure to sexual content in movies at an early age probably influences adolescents' sexual behavior. And yet, even though a great deal of research has shown that adolescents who watch more risky behaviors in popular movies, like drinking or smoking, are more likely to drink and smoke themselves, surprisingly little research has examined whether movies influence adolescents' sexual behaviors. Until now. Over six years, psychological scientists...

Can You Be Judged For Your Shoes?
2012-06-14 15:01:43

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com It´s often been said the first thing women notice about men is their shoes. Now, a new study suggests men AND women make several snap judgments about one another based solely (get it?!) on your footwear. For example, with a quick glance at someone´s feet, we can predict – with some accuracy – a person´s age, income, and whether they´re the clingy one in a relationship. Researchers from the University of Kansas and Wellesley...

2012-06-12 10:36:53

A father's love contributes as much – and sometimes more – to a child's development as does a mother's love. That is one of many findings in a new large-scale analysis of research about the power of parental rejection and acceptance in shaping our personalities as children and into adulthood. "In our half-century of international research, we've not found any other class of experience that has as strong and consistent effect on personality and personality development as does...

Chances Are, Your Smile Is From Frustration
2012-05-25 11:33:39

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com Although some people may appear to be grinning after you say a clever comment about how they gained holiday weight, a new study confirms it's merely a smile out of frustration, rather than humor. Experiments conducted by MIT researchers found that 90 percent of participants in their study actually expressed frustration through smiling. The findings could help pave the way for computers to help assess the emotional state of their users, and train those...

2012-05-15 13:32:45

The mothers of Britain's 'mixed families' are ensuring their children learn about their heritage and culture, according to a development project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). So, even if the child´s father hails from a minority background, it will still be the mother who is responsible for teaching them about the father´s culture. "Whether it's ensuring their children know about the history and culture of their ethnic or religious group, overseeing...

2012-05-03 15:50:03

People who experience Childhood Emotional Maltreatment (CEM) are more likely to have troubled romantic relationships in adult years, according to Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers. In two separate studies, doctoral candidate Dana Lassri and Prof. Golan Shahar of BGU's Department of Psychology examined the stability and satisfaction of intimate relationships among college students with a history of CEM. The studies, published in the Journal of Social & Clinical...

2012-04-03 20:10:31

People who are excluded by others online, such as on Facebook, may feel just as bad as if they had been excluded in person, according to researchers at Penn State and Misericordia University. "If you've ever felt bad about being 'ignored' on Facebook you're not alone," said Joshua Smyth, professor of biobehavioral health and of medicine at Penn State. "Facebook -- with its approximately 800 million users -- serves as a place to forge social connections; however, it is often a way to...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'