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Latest Intertropical Convergence Zone Stories

Earth Day View Of The Americas
2014-04-22 09:34:20

NASA Today, April 22, 2014 is Earth Day, and what better way to celebrate than taking a look at our home planet from space. NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this stunning view of the Americas on Earth Day, April 22, 2014 at 11:45 UTC/7:45 a.m. EDT. The data from GOES-East was made into an image by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. In North America, clouds associated with a cold front stretch from Montreal, Canada, south through the...

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2011-05-12 11:34:40

A sediment core from a South American lake revealed a steady, sharp drop in crucial monsoon rainfall since 1900, leading to the driest conditions in 1,000 years as of 2007 and threatening tropical populations with water shortages, a team from Pitt, Union College, and SUNY-Albany reports in PNAS A 2,300-year climate record University of Pittsburgh researchers recovered from an Andes Mountains lake reveals that as temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere rise, the planet's densely populated...

2009-12-02 19:01:45

Distinct long-term variations of wet and dry phases in the tropics of East Africa Climatic fluctuations close to the equator show a different pattern to climate change in the Arctic and Antarctic. In the tropics distinct 11500 year fluctuations between wet and dry periods can be clearly identified which do not occur in temperature reconstructions of polar ice cores. The investigations of the climate of the last 25000 years in tropical Africa show that dry phases prevailed during lower solar...

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2009-07-01 13:45:00

The rain band near the equator that determines the supply of freshwater to nearly a billion people throughout the tropics and subtropics has been creeping north for more than 300 years, probably because of a warmer world, according to research published in the July issue of Nature Geoscience.If the band continues to migrate at just less than a mile (1.4 kilometers) a year, which is the average for all the years it has been moving north, then some Pacific islands near the equator "“ even...

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2009-06-03 13:51:29

Experts say a nearly continuous band of colliding weather systems near the equator has been the birthplace of some of the world's strongest storms. Scientists call the region the Intertropical Convergence Zone, where winds from the northern and southern hemispheres clash. This mixture spawns violent thunderstorms that can tower up to 60,000 feet. Such storms are far higher than any commercial airliner could fly over and officials suspect the Air France jet carrying 228 people that crashed...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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