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Latest Intron Stories

2010-03-22 11:03:29

Like a film director cutting out extraneous footage to create a blockbuster, the cellular machine called the spliceosome snips out unwanted stretches of genetic material and joins the remaining pieces to fashion a template for protein production. But more than box office revenues are at stake: if the spliceosome makes a careless cut, disease likely results. Using a new approach to studying the spliceosome, a team led by University of Michigan chemistry and biophysics professor Nils Walter,...

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2009-12-15 08:25:00

TAU researchers unravel the mysteries of DNA packaging Imagine a huge spool of film containing thousands of sequences of random scenes. Without a talented editor, a screening would have no meaning. The RNA "spools" that make up DNA in our genes need careful editing, too. Genes are composed of meaningful sequences, called exons, separated by meaningless junk sections called introns. In order for cells to produce RNA "” the material that is required to create proteins that are vital for...

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2009-12-10 12:48:52

The sequences of nonsense DNA that interrupt genes could be far more important to the evolution of genomes than previously thought, according to a recent Science report by Indiana University Bloomington and University of New Hampshire biologists. Their study of the model organism Daphnia pulex (water flea) is the first to demonstrate the colonization of a single lineage by "introns," as the interrupting sequences are known. The scientists say introns are inserted into the genome far more...

2009-11-04 15:00:26

A chemical cousin of the common antibiotic tetracycline might be useful in treating spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a currently incurable disease that is the leading genetic cause of death in infants. This is the finding of a research collaboration involving Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and scientists from Paratek Pharmaceuticals and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. SMA is caused by mutations in a gene called Survival of Motor Neuron 1...

2009-01-29 08:58:51

U1, which guides the cell's RNA splicing machinery, 'slides' one RNA base, explaining a mysterious mutationTwo molecular biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have uncovered important new details about how a gene mutation causes a cellular editing error that results in a devastating disease called pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). The new findings were published online, ahead of print, on January 25th in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.Typically striking during early...

2008-12-26 06:43:20

An international research team led by Tim Nilsen, Ph.D., a professor of medicine and biochemistry and the director of the School of Medicine's Center for RNA Molecular Biology, has discovered an unexpected mechanism governing alternative splicing, the process by which single genes produce different proteins in different situations. The new mechanism suggests that curing the more than half of genetic diseases that are caused by mutations in the genetic code that in turn create mistakes in...

2008-08-13 18:00:14

By Ponomarev, Vladimir Recent years have witnessed a remarkable increase in our knowledge and understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of human diseases. During the past 2 decades, technologic innovations revolutionized molecular and cell biology. Significant progress in the understanding of the molecular-genetic mechanisms of many diseases has been achieved with the advent of the modern molecular- biologic assays. The development of transgenic animal models of human diseases,...

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2008-04-09 09:00:00

Splicing exerts selective pressure on DNA sequenceThe Human Genome Project revealed that only a small fraction of the 3 billion "letter" DNA code actually instructs cells to manufacture proteins, the workhorses of most life processes. This has raised the question of what the remaining part of the human genome does. How much of the rest performs other biological functions, and how much is merely residue of prior genetic events? Scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and the...

2005-10-20 14:19:18

PHILADELPHIA "“ The discovery in 1977 that the coding regions of a gene could appear in separate segments along the DNA won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Richard J. Roberts and Phillip A. Sharp. The active segments of a gene were termed exons, separated from each other within the gene by inactive introns. The research suggested the necessary existence of a number of biological processes and active entities, many of which have since been tracked down by other...

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2005-08-22 14:15:00

PITTSBURGH -- Important messages require accurate transmission. Big genes are especially challenging because they combine many coding segments (exons) that lie between long stretches of non-coding elements (introns). During processing, introns are snipped out and exons pasted together to form a template for proteins called messenger RNA (mRNA). Mistakes in RNA processing can reduce the expression of a functional protein or, worse, produce an abnormal protein that interferes with normal cell...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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