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Latest Invasive species Stories

2014-04-10 11:20:32

Foreign species that are devastating water ecosystems could be "hitchhiking" around Britain on canoeists' and anglers' kit, according to a new study. Invaders like the killer shrimp, zebra mussel and American signal crayfish have already caused extensive environmental damage and millions of pounds of economic costs. The new research, led by the University of Leeds and the Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), found that the cleaning habits of anglers and...

2014-04-08 23:03:03

An article featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management reports on the results of field tests on the fertile “PowerCrane” line of giant miscanthus. A sterile hybrid, the giant miscanthus is a promising bioenergy crop. Lawrence, KS (PRWEB) April 08, 2014 Cultivation of large grasses for bioenergy production is gaining interest as a renewable fuel source. A sterile hybrid, giant miscanthus, is a promising bioenergy crop that, unfortunately, carries a high establishment...

2014-03-26 11:34:19

One of the most serious threats to global biodiversity and the leisure and tourism industries is set to increase with climate change according to new research by Queen's University Belfast. Researchers at Queen's have found that certain invasive weeds, which have previously been killed off by low winter temperatures, are set to thrive as global temperatures increase. The team based at Quercus, Northern Ireland's centre for biodiversity and conservation science research, predicts that...

2014-03-19 23:02:46

A study published in the current issue of Rangeland Ecology & Management investigates the correlation between human development and the dissemination of invasive plants. The researchers found a correlation, but also an unexpected effect of indirect human influence that allowed invasive plants to spread far beyond man-made centers. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) March 19, 2014 Rangeland Ecology & Management – Do invasive plant species follow human activity into remote rangelands? If...

2014-02-10 23:01:30

The Weed Science Society of America discusses the upcoming National Invasive Species Awareness Week (February 23-28) and identifies ways individuals can prevent the spread of invasive plants. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) February 10, 2014 National Invasive Species Awareness Week is scheduled for February 23-28. And according to experts with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA), it’s a topic that deserves our attention. Non-native plants, animals and pathogens can harm humans and...

Invasive Plants A Problem In Europe
2014-02-03 12:51:48

Pensoft Publishers Some introduced (i.e. non-native) plants become abundant, threaten species richness and the well-functioning of ecosystems, the economy, or health (plant invasion). Environmental policies that attempt to restrict the expansion of non-native species are based on a consensus among scientific experts that invasions are a serious environmental problem. An example of a problematic non-native species in many parts of the world is Fallopia japonica, the Japanese knotweed that...

Dispersal Patterns Are Key To Invasive Species' Success
2014-01-21 12:48:06

Duke University Bacterial test of a theory has implications for ecology and infectious disease In 1859 an Australian farmer named Thomas Austin released 24 grey rabbits from Europe into the wild because it "could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting." By the end of the century, the rabbits had begun to overrun native ecosystems, reaching nationwide numbers of 600 million by 1950. They were propagating under a principle known as the Allee...

2014-01-17 23:04:36

An article published in the latest issue of Invasive Plant Science and Management features a survey of natural resource professionals and ranchers in Colorado and Wyoming. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) January 17, 2014 Downy brome is an aggressive, invasive winter annual grass and may be the most abundant plant in the western United States. Ranchers and natural resource professionals agree: downy brome, also called cheatgrass, is a problem. The consensus, however, ends there. These two groups...

Plants Develop Competitive Strategies In Extreme Desert Environments
2014-01-01 06:53:13

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Plants in extreme desert environments develop effective strategies to compete for the area’s limited resources, according to new research out of the University of Arizona published in the American Journal of Botany. Although deserts are often thought of as barren, inhospitable places, numerous plants and animals have adapted to this harsh environment, where they are often forced to compete with rivals for scarce resources such...

Researcher Finds 'Goldilocks' Effect In Snail Populations
2013-12-04 08:18:59

University of Iowa Finding may one day help control invasive species A University of Iowa researcher has discovered that a “Goldilocks” effect applies to the reproductive output of a tiny New Zealand snail—considered a troublesome species in many countries—that may one day help environmentalists control their spread. Known in the United States as the “New Zealand mud snail,” the freshwater snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) grows to a length of about one-quarter inch in...


Latest Invasive species Reference Libraries

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2008-04-30 23:09:30

The Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas), is the native oyster of the Pacific coast of Korea, Japan and China. It has been introduced to North America, especially in Puget Sound, Washington, and to the Australian states of Tasmania and South Australia. It is an important commercial harvest in all of these places, as well as New Zealand where the Pacific oyster has replaced the native rock oyster, Crassostrea glomerata, as the main commercial species. The Pacific oyster is an invasive species...

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