Quantcast

Latest Invasive species Stories

2011-08-15 09:00:00

Findings demonstrate substantial returns on screening program relative to current costs of open-door policy WASHINGTON, Aug. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In a major new study published in the journal Ecological Economics, scientists and economists have, for the first time, statistically demonstrated the net benefits of doing risk assessments for the live wild animal trade. The study estimates that the long-term expected net benefits from implementing a risk screening system range...

2011-08-10 18:11:41

Threat to ecosystem biodiversity studied using multiple interactions Invasive species cost an estimated $1.4 trillion annually in their environmental and economic impacts worldwide and are second only to habitat loss as a threat to biodiversity. As scientists struggle with the challenge of controlling invasive species, the question of why some species are so successful continually arises. Recent research conducted by Dr. Alison Bennett and Dr. Sharon Strauss at the University of California,...

2011-08-10 18:06:18

Road maintenance may accidentally spread the seeds of invasice plants, according to Penn State researchers. "The road graders that are used during these operations can act like a plow, pushing seeds along the road," said Emily Rauschert, senior project associate and applied ecologist in crop and soil sciences. "They can pick up seeds of an invasive grass and spread them several orders of magnitude further than the natural dispersal." The researchers created a computer simulation based on...

457e0655f866f48cce8296e6eb4310a8
2011-08-01 09:20:00

University of Georgia student Virginia Schutte describes how a summer in Taiwan gave her the opportunity to get to the bottom of an invasive species problem in mangrove forests there By Virginia G. W. Schutte, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia When I was offered a chance to study in Taiwan, I was very excited for the opportunity to do environmental research in a different part of the world. But, I was also nervous about living in Asia. My only experiences with Asian culture before...

a6b37dd087cbffb7a713b9709461afb4
2011-07-31 07:26:40

Invasive tree afflicting Gulf Coast was not brought to US by Ben Franklin The DNA evidence is in, and Ben Franklin didn't do it. Genetic tests on more than 1,000 Chinese tallow trees from the United States and China show the famed U.S. statesman did not import the tallow trees that are overrunning thousands of acres of U.S. coastal prairie from Florida to East Texas. "It's widely known that Franklin introduced tallow trees to the U.S. in the late 1700s," said Rice University biologist Evan...

2011-07-29 14:48:25

Invasive grasses are better equipped than natives to deal with increasing temperatures California's native grasses, already under pressure from invasive exotic grasses, are likely to be pushed aside even more as the climate warms, according to a new analysis from the University of California, Berkeley. In the study, which has been accepted for publication in the journal Global Change Biology and is now available online, UC Berkeley biologists catalogued the ranges of all 258 native grasses...

0a2ad54584a63eebd75887906ef7bfd9
2011-07-15 07:40:00

The worldwide decline of top predators, or "consumers", such as wolves, sharks and lions, is threatening to drive other species to extinction, an international team of 24 scientists reported on Thursday. The research shows for the first time the critical importance that large animals have within the world's ecosystem. "Until recently, large apex consumers were ubiquitous across the globe and had been for millions of years. The loss of these animals may be humankind's most pervasive influence...

f86bf3b11c77bb0ca96ad5b266603646
2011-07-14 10:15:16

Exotic marine species, including giant seaweeds, are spreading fast, with harmful effects on native species, and are increasingly affecting the biodiversity of the Mediterranean seabed. Some native species, such as sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus), can fight off this invasion, but only during its early stages, or when seaweed densities are very low. Spanish researchers have carried out a study to look at the ability of sea urchins (Paracentrotus lividus) "“ generalist herbivores that...

2011-07-13 22:26:52

Researchers investigate the spread of invasive plant species in South America and Australia Invasive plant species in Chile pose a higher threat to its neighbour, Argentina, than vice versa. This was concluded by scientists from the University of Concepci³n in Chile and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) after analysing the flora of both countries. In particular, 22 non-native species which occur in Chile on connecting roads leading to Argentina present a high risk...

2011-07-13 13:53:37

North Carolina State University researchers have found that a subset of fungus-farming ambrosia beetles may be in the early stages of a global epidemic threatening a number of economically important trees, including avocados, poplars and oaks. "Only about 12 species of ambrosia beetle are creating problems so far, but there are thousands of other species in the world, many of which could be devastating to any number of tree species," says Dr. Jiri Hulcr, a postdoctoral research associate at...


Latest Invasive species Reference Libraries

0_bcb002f712b1585389e4e3a20e4e9701
2008-04-30 23:09:30

The Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas), is the native oyster of the Pacific coast of Korea, Japan and China. It has been introduced to North America, especially in Puget Sound, Washington, and to the Australian states of Tasmania and South Australia. It is an important commercial harvest in all of these places, as well as New Zealand where the Pacific oyster has replaced the native rock oyster, Crassostrea glomerata, as the main commercial species. The Pacific oyster is an invasive species...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
Related