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Latest Invasive species Stories

2011-02-11 16:03:30

A team of scientists has discovered that human-introduced, invasive species of plants can have positive ecological effects. Tomás Carlo, an assistant professor of biology at Penn State University, and Jason Gleditsch, a graduate student in the Department of Biology, have studied how invasive fruiting plants affect ecosystems and how those effects, contrary to prevailing ideas, sometimes can be beneficial to an ecological community. The team's research, which will be published in the...

2011-02-01 17:06:11

Invasive plant species present a serious environmental, economic and social problem worldwide as their abundance can lead to lost native biodiversity and ecosystem functions, such as nutrient cycling. Despite substantial research, little is known about why some species can dominate new habitats over native plants that technically should have the advantage. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced versus native communities, because they are...

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2010-12-30 09:10:00

Collapse of Earth's marine life 378 to 375 million years ago holds key An influx of invasive species can stop the dominant natural process of new species formation and trigger mass extinction events, according to research results published Dec. 29 in the journal PLoS ONE. The study of the collapse of Earth's marine life 378 to 375 million years ago suggests that the planet's current ecosystems, which are struggling with biodiversity loss, could meet a similar fate. Although Earth has...

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2010-12-21 06:00:00

Animals and plants introduced from foreign habitats may not seem harmful and can coexist with native species for decades, according to a European study published Monday. Species that are taken away from their natural predators and placed elsewhere can disrupt native species in their new habitats, and scientists say the problem is already costing Europe $16 billion per year. The study, published in the US Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which is likely to hold true for other...

2010-12-07 15:31:42

While Asian carp, gypsy moths and zebra mussels hog invasive-species headlines, many invisible invaders are altering ecosystems and flourishing outside of the limelight. A study by Elena Litchman, Michigan State University associate professor of ecology, sheds light on why invasive microbial invaders shouldn't be overlooked or underestimated. "Invasive microbes have many of the same traits as their larger, 'macro' counterparts and have the potential to significantly impact terrestrial and...

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2010-11-24 08:00:48

Lions, bears, monkeys, crocodiles, parrots and iguanas may seem inoffensive at first glance when they're behind bars in zoos. But some exotic species can escape and become invasive species. This has been confirmed by a scientific team that has checked 1,568 animal houses in 63 Spanish zoos. Birds are the animals most likely to escape. "As zoos house a large number of exotic (non-indigenous) species, they could become an entry channel for these species if they escape, with the potential...

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2010-11-17 13:52:49

On the rocks just beneath the tides, the faster the water is moving in an area, the greater the variety of invertebrate creatures that will live there. Understanding that water flow is a strong predictor of diversity could be a huge boon to efforts to manage coastal ecosystems. One of biggest factors promoting the diversity of coastal ocean life is how fast the water flows, according to new research by ecologists at Brown University. Experiments and observation in Palau, Alaska, and Maine...

2010-11-16 13:40:00

BUFFALO, N.Y., Nov. 16, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists from the Great Lakes Center at Buffalo State College will be taking a close look at Lake Erie's ecological health, thanks to three grants totaling $1.7 million from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Great Lakes National Program Office. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20101116/DC02571) (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20101116/DC02571) The largest grant, $972,583, funds the purchase of...

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2010-11-12 10:20:35

A new field study confirms that an invasive weed called medusahead has growth advantages over most other grass species, suggesting it will continue to spread across much of the West, disrupt native ecosystems and make millions of acres of grazing land almost worthless. The research, by scientists from Oregon State University and the Agricultural Research Service, was one of the most comprehensive studies ever done that compared the "relative growth rate" of this invasive annual grass to that...

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2010-11-11 10:59:02

An international team led by the Forest Technology Centre of Catalonia has carried out the first large-scale study of the threats facing freshwater fish in the Mediterranean basin. Invasive species, along with over-exploitation of water resources, are the most important pressures, and those that expose fish to the greatest risk of extinction. "The continental fish of the Mediterranean basin are one of the most threatened biological groups in the world", Miguel Clavero, lead author of the...


Latest Invasive species Reference Libraries

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2008-04-30 23:09:30

The Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas), is the native oyster of the Pacific coast of Korea, Japan and China. It has been introduced to North America, especially in Puget Sound, Washington, and to the Australian states of Tasmania and South Australia. It is an important commercial harvest in all of these places, as well as New Zealand where the Pacific oyster has replaced the native rock oyster, Crassostrea glomerata, as the main commercial species. The Pacific oyster is an invasive species...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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