Quantcast

Latest Invasive species Stories

2010-07-13 18:25:04

A new beetle that could be used to control the invasive weed skunk vine has been identified by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators. The insect, named Himalusa thailandensis, was found in Thailand by entomologists Bob Pemberton (now retired), with the ARS Invasive Plants Research Laboratory (IPRL) in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Tony Wright, with the ARS Australian Biological Control Laboratory (ABCL) in Brisbane, Australia; and Amporn Winotai, a cooperator with the...

2010-06-16 22:18:21

In an effort to assess ties between birds' feeding habits and the spread of nonnative invasive plants, researchers provided ornithologists from four U.S. states with questionnaires on daily bird-plant encounters. The 1,143 unique interactions reported by the birders laid the groundwork for a study on the role of native birds in the seed dispersal of invasive plants throughout the U.S. Clare Aslan and Marcel Rejmánek of the University of California, Davis mailed questionnaires to more...

6ac51d9bf2beff3f7c749689712cc6e61
2010-06-16 10:54:53

A new study of biological invasions in Europe found they were linked not so much to changes in climate or land cover, but to two dominant factors - more money and more people. Wealth and population density, along with an increase in international trade and commerce, were the forces most strongly associated with invasive species that can disrupt ecosystems and cause severe ecological or agricultural damage, scientists said. An international group of 26 researchers reported the new findings...

2010-06-08 12:32:01

A new study of biological invasions in Europe found they were linked not so much to changes in climate or land cover, but to two dominant factors "“ more money and more people. Wealth and population density, along with an increase in international trade and commerce, were the forces most strongly associated with invasive species that can disrupt ecosystems and cause severe ecological or agricultural damage, scientists said. An international group of 26 researchers reported the new...

2010-05-25 09:28:30

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered animal populations may often be under a much larger threat from parasites than previously recognized. It is widely believed that the absence of parasites in species which 'invade' ecosystems gives these 'invaders' an advantage in their new homes (the 'enemy release hypothesis'). But now, researchers from Queen's have discovered quite the opposite, with the presence of parasites in these invasive species actually increasing the damage...

4849b6222609b8b1b0d8f7da7ceceaf61
2010-05-17 10:50:00

In 1988, a mysterious invader washed upon the New Jersey shore. The Asian shore crab likely arrived in ballast from commercial ships, and it found its new home to be quite agreeable. More than two decades later, the crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has expanded its range along the Atlantic coast northward to Maine and southward to North Carolina. Its numbers continue to expand, and wildlife biologists have found them in greater densities along New England's cobbled shores. Another tale of an...

2010-05-14 13:57:00

OXFORD, Ohio, May 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A study by scientists and colleagues of Miami University's Global Change Limnology Laboratory has demonstrated that maintaining high ultraviolet (UV) transparency in Lake Tahoe may be the key to reducing invasion of warm-water fish, such as bluegill, that threaten the native fish species in the lake. The study, led by Andrew Tucker, doctoral student in zoology at Miami, is published in the March issue of the journal Ecology. (Logo:...

bc81b365c929534e8f34498f4f38f7911
2010-05-14 07:35:31

An aggressive, invasive aquatic organism that is on the state's most dangerous species list has been discovered in both Winchester Bay and Coos Bay, and scientists say this "colonial tunicate" "“ Didemnum vexillum "“ has serious economic and environmental implications. Its propensity to foul surfaces of boats, fishing nets, water intakes, docks and buoys could make it costly to control, and its ability to smother shellfish beds and sensitive marine environments threatens other...

3a0419640047403cc6ce3926bb16eecb1
2010-04-29 12:28:38

Spanish and French researchers have evaluated the spread of the invasive mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki, which is native to the United States and lives in Mediterranean rivers in Spain and France. The scientists warn that climate change will extend the current distribution area of this and other invasive species to the north. The scientists at the University of Girona (UG) who coordinated this study say it is important to understand the interaction between climate change and invasive...

2010-04-07 13:09:00

Since destructive pests are often impossible to control once established, early detection is key to stopping their spread ARLINGTON, Va., April 7 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Until proposed revisions to the regulations governing international plant trade, currently under review, are approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), homeowners can play an important role in detection and reporting of invasive insects and diseases. New non-native plant pest introductions are detected at a...


Latest Invasive species Reference Libraries

0_bcb002f712b1585389e4e3a20e4e9701
2008-04-30 23:09:30

The Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas), is the native oyster of the Pacific coast of Korea, Japan and China. It has been introduced to North America, especially in Puget Sound, Washington, and to the Australian states of Tasmania and South Australia. It is an important commercial harvest in all of these places, as well as New Zealand where the Pacific oyster has replaced the native rock oyster, Crassostrea glomerata, as the main commercial species. The Pacific oyster is an invasive species...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
Related