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Latest Ion channels Stories

2010-12-13 21:10:37

Researchers have provided the first thorough mechanistic account of how a genetic defect leads to malignant hypothermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD), rare genetic skeletal muscle disorders. The study appears in the January issue of the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org). Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1), the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) activated during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, give rise to CCD. One of...

2010-11-15 12:12:44

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have demonstrated that the gene mutated in cystic fibrosis not only controls traffic on the chloride highway, but also keeps the sodium highway from being overused. An imbalance of salt and water in patients with cystic fibrosis makes their lungs clog up with sticky mucus that is prone to infection. The cause of the offending imbalance is a well-known genetic error, one that blocks the molecular expressway for...

2010-11-05 09:00:00

WATERTOWN, Mass., Nov. 5, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- EnVivo Pharmaceuticals today announced it has discovered that EVP-6124, its alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, possesses a novel mechanism not previously seen in the scientific community: it acts as a co-agonist with Acetylcholine (ACh) to enhance cognition. By acting as a co-agonist and sensitizing the alpha-7 receptor, EVP-6124 makes it possible for smaller amounts of naturally occurring ACh, typically found in individuals...

2010-11-04 01:48:19

Using the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a team of researchers from the University of British Columbia has shed light on the ryanodine receptor, a structure within muscle cells that has been linked to life-threatening congenital heart conditions. The findings were published online today in the journal Nature. "The ryanodine receptor is a complex molecular machine within muscle cells," says Filip Van Petegem, an assistant professor in...

2010-10-26 02:50:03

Scientists are closer to solving one of the many mysteries of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases, thanks to a recent study conducted at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The research revealed a previously unknown connection between two ion channels, which, when misaligned, can cause the many bizarre symptoms that characterize the condition. The findings, reported in this week's online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), provide...

2010-10-12 18:18:07

Study recognized for significance and importance in the world's most common genetic disease A University of Missouri researcher believes his latest work moves scientists closer to a cure for cystic fibrosis, one of the world's most common fatal genetic diseases. The Journal of Biological Chemistry has published findings by Tzyh-Chang Hwang, a professor in the School of Medicine's Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology and the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. The publication...

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2010-09-29 09:25:00

Fizzy beverages light up same pain sensors as mustard and horseradish, a new study shows -- so why do we drink them? You may not think of the fizz in soda as spicy, but your body does. The carbon dioxide in fizzy drinks sets off the same pain sensors in the nasal cavity as mustard and horseradish, though at a lower intensity, according to new research from the University of Southern California. "Carbonation evokes two distinct sensations. It makes things sour and it also makes them burn. We...

2010-09-28 13:40:00

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Sept. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Molecular Devices, Inc., a leader in bioanalytical systems for drug discovery & development, life science research, and bioassay/test development, today announced that it is taking orders for its new IonWorks Barracuda(TM) Automated Patch Clamp System. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100406/SF82092LOGO) (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20100406/SF82092LOGO) Following the tradition of IonWorks®...

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2010-09-20 07:52:26

Crosstalk between ion channels points to new therapeutic strategy, Penn study finds The lab of Kevin Foskett, PhD, the Isaac Ott Professor of Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has found a possible new target for fighting cystic fibrosis (CF) that could compensate for the lack of a functioning ion channel in affected CF-related cells. Their finding appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The team explored the role of CFTR, the chloride ion channel...

2010-09-14 00:57:52

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that results in chronic kidney failure. Although the genes responsible for ADPKD have been identified (PKD1, PKD2), relatively little is known about how mutations in these genes promote cyst growth molecularly. In this paper, scientists at Children's Hospital in Boston, lead by Jordon Kreidberg, investigated the signaling pathways that go awry in the disease using mouse kidney epithelial cells in which Pkd1 was...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'