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Latest Ion channels Stories

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2010-09-20 07:52:26

Crosstalk between ion channels points to new therapeutic strategy, Penn study finds The lab of Kevin Foskett, PhD, the Isaac Ott Professor of Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has found a possible new target for fighting cystic fibrosis (CF) that could compensate for the lack of a functioning ion channel in affected CF-related cells. Their finding appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The team explored the role of CFTR, the chloride ion channel...

2010-09-14 00:57:52

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that results in chronic kidney failure. Although the genes responsible for ADPKD have been identified (PKD1, PKD2), relatively little is known about how mutations in these genes promote cyst growth molecularly. In this paper, scientists at Children's Hospital in Boston, lead by Jordon Kreidberg, investigated the signaling pathways that go awry in the disease using mouse kidney epithelial cells in which Pkd1 was...

2010-09-14 00:54:32

Experimental drug decreases size and number of cysts in animal model In work suggesting a new approach to treating polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a leading cause of kidney failure, researchers at Children's Hospital Boston were able to block the formation of fluid-filled cysts, the hallmark of the disease, in a mouse model. Their findings, using a compound that inhibits a receptor known as c-Met, will be published in the September 13th online edition of the Journal of Clinical...

2010-09-03 12:43:14

Findings could lead to new treatment approaches in pain, deafness and cardiac function Scripps Research Institute scientists have identified two proteins with potential to be important targets for research into a wide range of health problems, including pain, deafness, and cardiac and kidney dysfunction. The study was published in Science Express, the advanced, online edition of the journal Science, on September 2, 2010. In the study, the Scripps Research scientists identify two proteins,...

2010-09-02 12:31:18

Research links chemical in widely consumed foods to skin cancer The September cover story of the nation's leading cancer journal, "Cancer Research," features a new study from The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, that links capsaicin, a component of chili peppers, to skin cancer. While the molecular mechanisms of the cancer-promoting effects of capsaicin are not clear and remain controversial, The Hormel Institute has shown a definite connection to formation of skin cancer through...

2010-08-31 06:59:00

MUMBAI, India, August 31, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- - With This Announcement, Glenmark has Clearly Reaffirmed its Position Globally as the Leader in the TRP Space Glenmark Pharmaceuticals today announced the discovery of a Novel Chemical Entity(NCE) 'GRC 17536'. The new NCE program is targeting TRPA1 receptor antagonists for pain and respiratory disorders. TRPA1 belongs to Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels, which have generated a lot of interest as...

2010-08-25 14:58:54

Fruit flies stand in for mosquitoes in Johns Hopkins study Fire up the citronella-scented tiki torches, and slather on the DEET: Everybody knows these simple precautions repel insects, notably mosquitoes, whose bites not only itch and irritate, but also transmit diseases such as West Nile virus, malaria and dengue. Now, Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered what it is in the bugs' molecular makeup that enables citronellal (the aromatic liquid used in lotions, sprays and candles) and DEET,...

2010-08-17 17:05:33

New research in the Journal of General Physiology helps explain how the body's "flight-or-fight" response is mediated. The study, which may provide new answers to the question of how the heart pacemaker"”the sinoatrial (SA) node"”is regulated, appears online on August 16 (www.jgp.org). When the body goes into "flight-or-flight" response as a reaction to stress, the increased firing rate of the SA node increases the heart rate and cardiac output to deliver more oxygen and nutrients...

2010-08-09 07:58:00

TEL AVIV, Israel, August 9, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study conducted in the department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Tel Aviv University (TAU) elucidates the way in which toxic, yet essential, copper ions enter human cells. As a chemotherapy drug presumably enters the cells in a similar manner, the results of this study pave the way for the development of improved chemotherapeutic drugs. The groundbreaking work was published in the leading American scientific journal PNAS...

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2010-08-04 12:30:00

For those with high blood pressure, chili peppers might be just what the doctor ordered, according to a study reported in the August issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. While the active ingredient that gives the peppers their heat"”a compound known as capsaicin"”might set your mouth on fire, it also leads blood vessels to relax, the research in hypertensive rats shows. "We found that long-term dietary consumption of capsaicin, one of the most abundant components in...