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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 14:04 EDT

Latest Ionotropic receptors Stories

2013-08-20 23:21:18

ChanTest, a Contract Research Organization and world leader in ion channel drug safety and discovery, announces initiation of a project funded by the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products (CTP). Cleveland (PRWEB) August 20, 2013 ChanTest, a Contract Research Organization and world leader in ion channel drug safety and discovery, announces initiation of a project funded by the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products (CTP)....

2011-10-11 17:55:39

A tiny piece of a critical receptor that fuels the brain and without which sentient beings cannot live has been discovered by University at Buffalo scientists as a promising new drug target for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The research on the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor is being published online Oct. 11 in Nature Communications. "This is the first time that this site has been shown to be useful as a drug target," says Gabriela K. Popescu, PhD, associate...

2011-09-28 10:35:45

Researchers working with adult mice have discovered that learning and memory were profoundly affected when they altered the amounts of a certain protein in specific parts of the mammals' brains. The protein, called kibra, was linked in previous studies in humans to memory and protection against late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The new work in mice, reported in the Sept. 22 issue of Neuron, shows that kibra is an essential part of a complex of proteins that control the sculpting of brain...

2011-04-26 23:32:16

Structure of GluN2D subunit when docked with certain neurotransmitters helps explain the receptor's slow deactivation Structural biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) in collaboration with colleagues at Emory University have determined the molecular structure of a key portion, or subunit, of a receptor type commonly expressed in brain cells. The receptor is one of several NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor variants, and the subunit in question is that which specifically binds...

2011-02-07 18:25:30

Rice, University of Texas collaborators view C-clamp-like proteins implicated in neuro diseases A digital signal processing technique long used by statisticians to analyze data is helping Houston scientists understand the roots of memory and learning, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and stroke. Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) reported today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology that single molecule fluorescence...

2009-06-01 10:54:51

 A team of neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has demonstrated the mechanism by which a signaling protein found throughout the brain controls the maturation and strength of excitatory synapses, the tiny gaps across which the majority of neurons communicate.The discovery is important, in part, because deficits of the signaling protein in question, called oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), have been previously linked with X-linked mental retardation. Indeed, problems at the...

2009-04-06 16:17:59

Nicotine isn't just addictive, it may also interfere with dozens of cellular interactions in the body, U.S. researchers suggest. Brown University researchers say the data could help scientists develop better treatments for various diseases. It opens several new lines of investigation, lead author Edward Hawrot says in a statement. Hawrot and a team that included graduate students William Brucker and Joao Paulo looked specifically at the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mouse brain...

2009-02-12 09:07:03

New research provides strong support for the idea that one of the key functions of sleep is the consolidation of memories. The study, published by Cell Press in the February 12th issue of the journal Neuron, provides fascinating insight into the cellular mechanisms that govern the sleep-dependent consolidation of experiences that occur while we are awake.Although sleep is thought to facilitate memory and learning, the molecular links between sleep and synaptic plasticity are not well...

2005-11-22 16:12:01

In the neural train wreck that is stroke, the cutoff of oxygen kills brain cells through a buildup of acid, as well as by overexciting receptors on the surface of brain cells. Now, researchers exploring the detailed mechanism of this excitotoxicity and acidotoxicity have discovered how an insidious chain of molecular events contributes to its damage. In an article in the November 23, 2005, issue of Neuron, Jun Gao and colleagues say that their findings could contribute to the development of...