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Latest IPCC Third Assessment Report Stories

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2011-05-05 07:15:00

Climate scientists gathering at a conference on Arctic warming were asked Wednesday to explain the dramatic melting in the region in layman's terms, the Associated Press (AP) reports. An authoritative report released at the meeting in Copenhagen showed melting ice in the Arctic could result in global sea levels rising 5 feet within this century, much higher than previous forecasts. James White of the University of Colorado at Boulder told fellow researchers to use plain language when...

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2011-04-13 06:30:00

A top climate specialist with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said Tuesday that despite variations in predictions of climate change trends, Europe should take action over the increase in droughts and floods across the union. "There are some robust areas like Siberia, we know what the climate will be, another robust area is the Mediterranean, because the models tell the same story," said Zbigniew Kundzewicz, review editor of IPCC's chapter on freshwater resources. "Climate...

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2011-04-09 06:05:00

New forecasts on rising sea levels suggest that New York will be a big loser, while some regions, including those closer to polar regions, will win big, reports BBC News.. A 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecast sea levels to rise by as much as 1 foot by 2100. But that forecast was a global average. A Dutch team has now made an attempt to model all the factors leading to regional variations. And whatever the global figure turns out to be, there will be...

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2011-03-05 11:00:14

First global map suggests climate change will have greatest impact on the populations least responsible for causing the problemResearchers already study how various species of plants and animals migrate in response to climate change. Now, Jason Samson, a PhD candidate in McGill University's Department of Natural Resource Sciences, has taken the innovative step of using the same analytic tools to measure the impact of climate change on human populations. Samson and fellow researchers combined...

2011-02-17 21:26:48

How should a new 'IPCC for biodiversity' work? Leading world scientists offer prescription Scientific advice on the consequences of specific policy options confronting government decision makers is key to managing global biodiversity change. That's the view of leading scientists anxiously anticipating the first meeting of a new Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)-like mechanism for biodiversity at which its workings and work program will be defined. Writing in the journal...

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2011-02-16 10:00:00

New University of Washington research has found that the world is already committed to a warmer climate because of emissions that have occurred up to now. The researchers said that there would continue to be warming even if the most stringent policies were adopted because there would still be some emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane. The team found that even if all emissions were stopped now, temperatures would remain higher than pre-industrial...

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2011-02-04 07:55:24

The aggressive wolverine may not be powerful enough to survive climate change in the contiguous United States, new research concludes. Wolverine habitat in the northwestern United States is likely to warm dramatically if society continues to emit large amounts of greenhouse gases, according to new computer model simulations carried out at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The study found that climate change is likely to imperil the wolverine in two ways: reducing or...

2011-01-27 04:06:00

DAVOS, Switzerland, Jan. 27, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- International leaders attending the World Economic Forum in snow-covered Davos, Switzerland, are embracing the new perspective of the Global Adaptation Institute (www.globalai.org) that puts "adaptation" at the center of world climate policy. Institute CEO, Dr. Juan Jose Daboub, former Managing Director of the World Bank, speaking to journalists at the conference said: "Some of the world's most prominent private sector leaders...

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2011-01-20 09:00:00

The average global temperatures recorded throughout the year place 2010 in a tie with 1998 and 2005 for the title of warmest year ever recorded, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) announced in a press release on Thursday. The WMO's findings corroborate a Wednesday report by the US-based National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), which also found that last year's global surface temperatures were the co-hottest noted by meteorologists since they began keeping track of such...

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2011-01-19 14:00:00

An International research team has discovered that seasonal temperatures in Europe, above all in winter, have been affected over the past 500 years by natural factors such as volcanic eruptions and solar activity, and by human activities such as the emission of greenhouse gases. The study, with Spanish involvement, could help us to better understand the dynamics of climate change. Up until now, it was thought that Europe's climate prior to 1900 was barely affected by external factors, but now...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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