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Latest Iron fertilization Stories

emission and transport of dust and other important aerosols to the Southern Ocean on Dec. 30, 2006
2014-03-22 06:56:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a region of the Southern Ocean, iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive during the last ice age, according to a new study from Princeton University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. The findings, published in Science, confirm a longstanding theory that wind-borne dust carried iron to this region of the Antarctic. This iron dust drove plankton growth and eventually led to the removal of carbon dioxide...

2013-06-13 10:54:29

A new study on the feeding habits of ocean microbes calls into question the potential use of algal blooms to trap carbon dioxide and offset rising global levels. These blooms contain iron-eating microscopic phytoplankton that absorb C02 from the air through the process of photosynthesis and provide nutrients for marine life. But one type of phytoplankton, a diatom, is using more iron that it needs for photosynthesis and storing the extra in its silica skeletons and shells, according to an...

Carbon Dioxide Absorption In Antarctic Seas Studied
2013-06-13 09:39:28

Georgia Institute of Technology The seas around Antarctica can, at times, resemble a garden. Large-scale experiments where scientists spray iron into the waters, literally fertilizing phytoplankton, have created huge man-made algal blooms. Such geoengineering experiments produce diatoms, which pull carbon dioxide out of the air. Experts argue that this practice can help offset Earth´s rising carbon dioxide levels. However, the experiments are controversial and, according to a new...

Ocean Fertilization Suffocates Carbon, Reduces Climate Change
2012-07-19 10:19:23

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The negative impact of climate change might be avoided by dumping massive amounts of iron into the world´s oceans, which smothers carbon dioxide for centuries, according to an international team of researchers who have recently published results of an ocean iron fertilization experiment (EIFEX) carried out in 2004. The new study, published in the science journal Nature, shows that sowing the ocean with iron particles sucks up...

2012-07-19 02:39:31

The results, which were published in the scientific journal Nature, provide a valuable contribution to a better understanding of the global carbon cycle An international research team has published the results of an ocean iron fertilization experiment (EIFEX) carried out in 2004 in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature. Unlike the LOHAFEX experiment carried out in 2009, EIFEX has shown that a substantial proportion of carbon from the induced algal bloom sank to the deep sea...

North Atlantic Phytoplankton Bloom Triggered By Eddies
2012-07-06 05:16:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists studying the annual growth of tiny plants in the North Atlantic Ocean have discovered that this year´s growth spurt began before the sun was able to offer the light needed to fuel the yearly phenomenon. The annual growth spurt of plankton, which is known as the North Atlantic Bloom, takes place each Spring, and results in an immense number of phytoplankton bursting into existence -- first "greening," then...

2012-02-18 01:40:13

Phytoplankton Key to a Healthy Planet says Canada Research Chair at the Forefront of Phytoplankton Research Maria (Maite) Maldonado, Canada Research Chair in Phytoplankton Trace Metal Physiology at The University of British Columbia, has made understanding the intricacies of marine phytoplankton her life's work. These tiny, single-celled algae, which act as a natural sponge for carbon dioxide and are a critical part of the global carbon cycle, may play a key role in ensuring the health of...

Rising CO2 Levels At End Of Ice Age Not Linked To Pacific Ocean
2011-10-03 12:56:29

At the end of the last Ice Age, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rose rapidly as the planet warmed; scientists have long hypothesized that the source was CO2 released from the deep ocean. But a new study using detailed radiocarbon dating of foraminifera found in a sediment core from the Gorda Ridge off Oregon reveals that the Northeast Pacific was not an important reservoir of carbon during glacial times. The finding may send scientists back to the proverbial drawing board looking for...

2011-07-11 20:01:13

How deep is the ocean's capacity to buffer against climate change? As one of the planet's largest single carbon absorbers, the ocean takes up roughly one-third of all human carbon emissions, reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide and its associated global changes. But whether the ocean can continue mopping up human-produced carbon at the same rate is still up in the air. Previous studies on the topic have yielded conflicting results, says University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor Galen...

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2011-03-03 12:27:56

Phytoplankton peak arising up to 50 days early, with unknown impacts on marine food chain and carbon cycling Warming temperatures and melting ice in the Arctic may be behind a progressively earlier bloom of a crucial annual marine event, and the shift could hold consequences for the entire food chain and carbon cycling in the region. Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, along with colleagues in Portugal and Mexico, plotted the yearly spring bloom of...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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