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Latest Irony Stories

2012-10-15 16:06:23

When we read a text, we hear a voice talking to us. Yet the voice changes over time. In his new book titled Poesins röster, Mats Malm, professor in comparative literature at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that when reading older literature, we may hear completely different voices than contemporary readers did — or not hear any voices at all. 'When we read a novel written today, we hear a voice that speaks pretty much the same language we speak, and that...

2010-09-14 23:25:31

New Universit© de Montr©al study reveals they do New research findings from the Universit© de Montr©al reveals that children as young as four are able to understand and use irony. This study, published recently in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology, may impact the way parents communicate with their family. "Previous studies concluded that irony wasn't understood before the age of eight or ten," says Stephanie Alexander, a postdoctoral student at the...

2008-12-13 14:44:45

Elton John was not defamed by a British newspaper that offered a satirical take of the rock singer, a High Court judge has ruled. High Court Justice Michael Tugendhat found that while The Guardian did offer a satirical column about the Crocodile Rock singer, the article did not amount to libel and the court's ruling was not subject to appeal, the newspaper reported Saturday. Marina Hyde's July literary offering, A peek at the diary of Sir Elton John, prompted the knighted British singer to...

2008-07-05 09:00:06

By CHRISTINA PATTERSON "Cultures," said an academic called Professor Ellis Cashmore on Radio 4 this week, "are no better or worse than each other." Indeed. Cultures, for example, which offer a tasty smorgasbord of rabbits, beans and humans to whet the appetites of angry gods; cultures in which children who emerge from birth looking a little puny are left on hillsides to die; cultures which mark the emergence of a human infant with batteries of benefits; cultures in which politicians fawn...

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2005-05-24 07:45:00

Without it, snappy comments are a mystery HealthDay News -- Oh yeah, right! No, it's true -- many of you don't go a day without dishing out several doses of sarcasm. But some brain-damaged people can't comprehend sarcasm, and Israeli researchers think it's because a specific brain region has gone dark. The region, according to the researchers, handles the task of detecting hidden meaning, a crucial component of sarcasm. If that part of the brain is out of commission, the irony doesn't come...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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