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Latest Ischaemic heart disease Stories

2009-04-01 13:55:28

Nuclear medicine procedure is still the best predictor of event-free survival, according to article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine In a study comparing the ability of various medical techniques to accurately determine the extent of heart disease and stratify patients according to disease severity, researchers found that myocardial perfusion testing with gated single photon emission computed tomography (gated SPECT) was a more accurate predictor of prognosis in chronic ischemic heart...

2009-04-01 09:26:26

By Kirsten Houmann, Ivanhoe Health Correspondent Genetic testing could determine a person's probability of developing ischemic heart disease and predict the course the disease will take once it sets in, new research suggests. In a study that followed more than 1,500 heart attack patients for 20 years, researchers found a genetic variant in chromosome 9 affected the progression of coronary atherosclerosis in young patients who had suffered a heart attack and also influenced a person's chances...

2009-01-20 17:30:56

The severity of first heart attacks has dropped significantly and coronary heart disease deaths have declined in the United States, researchers said. This landmark study suggests that better prevention and better management in the hospital have contributed to the reduction in deaths, lead author Dr. Merle Myerson, director of the Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital of Columbia University in New York City, said in a statement. Better control of risk...

2008-11-11 12:00:26

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- There is strong evidence that getting to the hospital quickly during a heart attack is critical, since early treatment saves both lives and heart muscle. And if the responsible coronary artery is completely blocked, it should be opened as soon as possible. What about patients with incomplete blockages, who have ACS or acute coronary syndrome? They should get to the hospital just as fast, but once there and on medical treatment, do they need...

2008-10-17 18:00:09

Coronary heart disease symptoms in women presented in the context of a stressful event are identified as psychogenic, or "in her head," U.S. researchers say. Eighty-seven internists and 143 family physicians evaluated a vignette of a 47-year-old male or a 56-year-old female -- by age at equal risk for cardiac heart disease. Half the vignettes included sentences indicating a life stressor and the appearance of anxiety. When stress was included, 15 percent of the women received a coronary...

2008-09-14 03:00:10

By Jaffe, Allan S BACKGROUND: Sophisticated methods of cardiac imaging have the potential to revolutionize the care of patients with cardiovascular disease. The benefits of these state-of-the art imaging techniques can be enhanced by their use in combination with new cardiac biomarkers. This review addresses potentially useful interactions between imaging and biomarkers. CONTENT: Areas were defined in which the combined use of novel imaging techniques and biomarkers would be most...

2008-09-13 12:00:00

To: MEDICAL EDITORS Contact: Beth Hodge, +1-240-429-9983, bhodge@asnc.org, or Steve Carter, +1-301-802-7100, scarter@asnc.org, both of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology BOSTON, Sept. 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- There are 21 million patients with Type 2 diabetes in the United States alone. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes. Silent myocardial ischemia is common, and cardiac death or myocardial infarction may be the first...

2008-08-28 15:00:56

By Dr Donohue Q: I am under treatment for angina. When I have an attack of chest pain, I usually can get rid of it with nitroglycerin. My neighbor, exactly my age, has the same thing: coronary artery disease with angina attacks. His doctor is treating him with leg pumps. He says he has had no angina since he started the treatment. Would this help me? A: The procedure, enhanced external counterpulsation, has been around for 10 years. A series of cuffs, like blood pressure cuffs, is...

2008-08-26 03:00:17

By Sharma, Meenakshi Nath, L M; Tandon, R; Shah, Bela Web-based secure communication systems have revolutionized data collection systems in medical research. Such systems provide opportunities for a study with exceptionally large sample sizes and have the potential to provide timely information about current trends in disease incidence, treatment, and outcomes. Globally, National Audit of Myocardial Infarction Project (MINAP)1, Prospective Registry Evaluating Outcomes after Myocardial...

2008-08-24 22:57:20

By Annie Freeda Cruez THE journalist was on his way to a nasi lemak breakfast with a colleague when he slumped in the car seat and died. He was just 41. A pulmonary and critical care physician tells ANNIE FREEDA CRUEZ that doctors are seeing more and more young people with coronary heart diseases. The modern sedentary lifestyle is the biggest culprit in the growing number of heart-related diseases in the country. Kuala Lumpur Hospital's consultant pulmonary and critical care physician,...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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