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Latest Isthmus of Panama Stories

Alligator Relative Traveled Across Ancient Land Bridge
2013-03-05 05:33:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Isthmus of Panama uplifted 2.6 million years ago to form a land bridge connecting North and South America. This bridge has long been thought to be the crucial step in the interchange of animals between the Americas. Armadillos and giant sloths moved up into North America and ancient relatives of modern horses, rabbits, foxes, pigs, cats, dogs and elephants moved down into South America. A new study from the University of Florida...

Ancient Camels From Panama Canal Excavation Named
2012-03-01 05:03:30

The discovery of two new extinct camel species by University of Florida scientists sheds new light on the history of the tropics, a region containing more than half the world's biodiversity and some of its most important ecosystems. Appearing online this week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, the study is the first published description of a fossil mammal discovered as part of an international project in Panama. Funded with a grant from the National Science Foundation, UF...

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2009-12-10 09:04:33

Despite their ability to fly, tropical birds waited until the formation of the land bridge between North and South America to move northward, according to a University of British Columbia study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition. "While many North American birds simply flew across the marine barriers that once separated the continents, tropical birds, especially those in Amazon forest regions, began colonization of North America almost...

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2008-07-31 10:27:11

Contrary to previous evidence, a new University of Florida study shows the Isthmus of Panama was most likely formed by a Central American Peninsula colliding slowly with the South American continent through tectonic plate movement over millions of years. The study, co-authored by Florida Museum of Natural History researchers Michael Kirby, Douglas Jones and Bruce MacFadden, is published in the July 30 issue of PLoS ONE, the online journal of the Public Library of Science. The study uses...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.