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Latest Jack Hills Stories

Australian Rock Determined To Be Oldest Material Formed On Earth
2014-02-24 13:04:03

[ Watch the Video: The Oldest Rock On Earth ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers, publishing a paper in the journal Nature Geoscience, say a rock in Australia is helping to paint a picture of how our planet became habitable 4.4 billion years ago. The team found data from a tiny fragment of zircon that confirms the Earth’s crust first formed 4.4 billion years ago, which is just 160 million years after the formation of the Solar System. John Valley,...

Diamonds In Earth's Oldest Zircons Are Fragments Of Polishing Compound
2013-12-19 07:44:15

University of California - Riverside As is well known, the Earth is about 4.6 billion years old. No rocks exist, however, that are older than about 3.8 billion years. A sedimentary rock section in the Jack Hills of western Australia, more than 3 billion years old, contains within it zircons that were eroded from rocks as old as about 4.3 billion years, making these zircons, called Jack Hills zircons, the oldest recorded geological material on the planet. In 2007 and 2008, two research...

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2008-07-02 18:55:00

A recent study has shown that tiny slivers of diamond forged on an infant Earth may contain the earliest traces of life. The crystals contain a form of carbon often associated with plants and bacteria. The researchers caution that their results are not definitive proof of early life but do "not exclude" the possibility. "We're all a little sceptical," said Dr Martin Whitehouse of the Swedish Museum of Natural History and one of the authors of the paper. If the study is proven to be true then...

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2008-06-14 08:45:48

MADISON - A new analysis of ancient minerals called zircons suggests that a harsh climate may have scoured and possibly even destroyed the surface of the Earth's earliest continents. Zircons, the oldest known materials on Earth, offer a window in time back as far as 4.4 billion years ago, when the planet was a mere 150 million years old. Because these crystals are exceptionally resistant to chemical changes, they have become the gold standard for determining the age of ancient rocks, says...

2005-11-17 18:40:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON -- Tiny zircon crystals dug up from ancient Australian deposits appear to have been formed right after the birth of the planet -- a finding that suggests that early on, Earth had a cool crust much like today's that could have harbored life, scientists said on Thursday. Most remnants of the very early crust, formed more than 4 billion years ago, are gone -- recycled as part of the steady ongoing process known as plate tectonics. But...

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2005-06-03 17:50:00

NASA -- Research funded partly by NASA has confirmed the existence of liquid water on the Earth's surface more than 4 billion years ago. Scientists have found that the Earth had formed patterns of crust formation, erosion and sediment recycling as early as 4.35 billion years ago. Their findings came during a study of zircon crystals formed during the earliest period of Earth's history, the Hadean Eon (4.5 billion to 4.0 billion years ago). "NASA is interested in how early the Earth had...

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2005-05-06 07:27:49

TROY, N.Y. -- Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Australian National University have found new evidence that environmental conditions on early Earth, within 200 million years of solar system formation, were characterized by liquid-water oceans and continental crust similar to those of the present day. The researchers developed a new thermometer that made the discovery possible. "Our data support recent theories that Earth began a pattern of crust formation, erosion, and...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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