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Latest Jaelyn Eberle Stories

Better Understanding Arctic Climate Change Based On Shark Teeth
2014-07-10 08:44:06

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Today, polar bears and other animals adapted to extremely cold environments inhabit the Arctic tundra. In the past, around 53 to 38 million years ago (the Eocene epoch), the Arctic was not a frozen tundra -- rather, it was more like a huge temperate forest with brackish water. This forest was home to a wide variety of wildlife, including the ancestors of modern-day tapirs, hippo-like creatures, crocodiles and giant tortoises....

reconstruction of the early Eocene
2014-07-09 09:33:31

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Silvacola acares is a tiny hedgehog species that lived roughly 52-million-years ago, during the Eocene Epoch. Its fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia. Along with the tiny hedgehog, the fossils of a tapir-like animal were also discovered. A paper on the discovery of these two ancient mammals is being published today in the Journal of Vertebrate...

modern day sand tiger shark
2014-07-01 05:12:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most sharks today are strictly saltwater fish, however, a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago reveals that this was not the case 50 million years ago. Sharks in the Arctic Ocean during this time lived in brackish water, with approximately the same amount of freshwater found in modern day Lake Ponchatrain in Louisiana. The study, led by University of Chicago postdoctoral researcher Sora...

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2010-08-24 15:13:32

A new study of the High Arctic climate roughly 50 million years ago led by the University of Colorado at Boulder helps to explain how ancient alligators and giant tortoises were able to thrive on Ellesmere Island well above the Arctic Circle, even as they endured six months of darkness each year. The new study, which looked at temperatures during the early Eocene period 52 to 53 million years ago, also has implications for the impacts of future climate change as Arctic temperatures continue...

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2010-06-30 07:14:49

A new study shows the Arctic climate system may be more sensitive to greenhouse warming than previously thought, and that current levels of Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide may be high enough to bring about significant, irreversible shifts in Arctic ecosystems. Led by the University of Colorado at Boulder, the international study indicated that while the mean annual temperature on Ellesmere Island in the High Arctic during the Pliocene Epoch 2.6 to 5.3 million years ago was about 34 degrees...

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2009-06-01 13:39:42

Ancestors of tapirs and ancient cousins of rhinos living above the Arctic Circle 53 million years ago endured six months of darkness each year in a far milder climate than today that featured lush, swampy forests, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Jaelyn Eberle said the study shows several varieties of prehistoric mammals as heavy as 1,000 pounds each lived on what is today Ellesmere Island near Greenland on a summer diet of...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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