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Latest Jamaican culture Stories

2012-11-01 10:11:49

Many young Jamaican immigrants are succeeding in the United States precisely because they remain strongly tied to Jamaican culture, said University of Illinois professor Gail M. Ferguson. "Although many of these youths have forged a unique tricultural identity that draws from their Jamaican culture, African-American culture, and mainstream European American culture, the important factor in their academic and behavioral success is retaining strong ties to their Jamaican background," she...

2009-05-07 14:42:14

Children as young as 19 months understand different dialects, researchers in Australia found. Catherine Best of MARCS Laboratories at the University of Western Sydney, along with colleagues from Haskins Laboratories and Wesleyan University, report the early development of this cross-dialect skill, which they term phonological constancy. The study, described in Psychological Science, suggests phonological constancy is evident by 19 months of age, but is not yet present at 15 months. In the...

2009-01-01 11:17:35

Vincent Ford, who helped write the song No Woman No Cry with reggae star Bob Marley, has died in Jamaica at the age of 68, an official says. Bob Marley Foundation spokesman Paul Kelly confirmed Ford, who helped Marley create the reggae hit in 1974, died last weekend of complications of diabetes and hypertension, the Jamaica Gleaner said Thursday. Kelly said Ford had been bound to a wheelchair after losing both his legs years earlier due to an illness. Ford had shared a tenement in the...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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