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Latest James A. Simmons Stories

2011-11-28 15:15:07

By placing real and virtual objects in the flight paths of bats, scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Munich have shed new light on how echolocation works. Their research is published today in Behavioral Processes. The researchers found that it is not the intensity of the echoes that tells the bats the size of an object but the 'sonar aperture', that is the spread of angles from which echoes impinge on their ears. Echolocating bats emit calls for orientation. These calls bounce...

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2011-07-31 07:15:59

In a paper published recently in the journal Science, researchers at Brown University and from the Republic of Georgia have learned how bats can home in on a target, virtually dismissing other objects in their midst. The trick lies in their neurons: Bats can separate a cavalcade of echoes returning from their sonar blasts by distinguishing changes in amplitude "” the intensity of the sound "” between different parts of each echo within 1.5 decibels, to decide whether the object is...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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