Quantcast

Latest Jeffrey Holt Stories

2013-02-14 23:02:19

Dr. Jeffrey Holt and Mrs. Nantiya Abraham Join Envera West Chester, PA (PRWEB) February 14, 2013 Envera announced today the addition of Jeffrey Holt and Nantiya Abraham to the Research and Development staff. Dr. Holt enters the company as a Research Scientist with Mrs. Abraham serving as a Research Technician. Mike Matheny, President and Owner of Envera stated, “The continued growth of our business, and Envera´s focus on research and development, has prompted the addition of...

2011-11-22 08:27:40

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Mutated genes in the sensory hair cells of the inner ear prevent sound waves from being converted into electrical signals- a fundamental first step in hearing. Restoring electrical signals in the sensory cells of deaf mice by introducing new genes allowed the mice to hear. The study paves the way for a test of gene therapy to reverse a type of deafness. Sound waves produce the sensation of hearing by jiggling protruding hair-like structures on sensory hair...

2011-11-21 23:12:05

Gene-therapy trial will attempt to restore hearing in deaf mice Researchers have found long-sought genes in the sensory hair cells of the inner ear that, when mutated, prevent sound waves from being converted to electric signals — a fundamental first step in hearing. The team, co-led by Jeffrey Holt, PhD, in the department of otolaryngology at Children´s Hospital Boston, and Andrew Griffith, MD, PhD, of the NIH´s National Institute on Deafness and other Communication...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related