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Latest Jewish history Stories

2006-07-25 14:44:39

By Torrye Jones NEW YORK (Reuters) - Many U.S. art museums have not done enough to determine whether they hold art looted from Holocaust victims, a Jewish advocacy group said on Tuesday. The group published a survey showing that while many museums had done much to establish whether their collections included "covered objects" -- works that might have been stolen by the Nazis -- others had considerable work still to do. "The average age of Holocaust survivors is over 80," said Gideon...

2006-07-24 09:57:05

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Rockets fired by Hizbollah guerrillas in Lebanon landed in Haifa and across northern Israel on Monday, wounding several people, rescue services said. Three people were wounded in the northern Israeli town of Tiberias, where eight rockets landed, local police said. At least one person was wounded in the Israeli border village of Shlomi. Other rockets struck the Haifa suburbs, Acre, Safed, the Upper Galilee and the Druze village of Kisra, the Haaretz newspaper...

2006-07-23 03:23:56

HAIFA, Israel (Reuters) - A fresh Hizbollah rocket barrage killed two people and seriously wounded several others in the northern Israeli city of Haifa on Sunday, medics said. They said rockets hit at least two apartments. The Haaretz newspaper Web site said 10 rockets had hit Israel's third largest city. Air raid sirens also sounded in the town of Zichron Yaakov, which lies 60 km (40 miles) south of the Lebanese border. It was unclear if any rockets had hit the town. None have yet...

2006-07-23 03:13:40

HAIFA, Israel (Reuters) - One person was killed in a Hizbollah rocket attack on the northern Israeli city of Haifa on Sunday, medics said.

2006-07-23 03:02:55

HAIFA, Israel (Reuters) - Hizbollah rockets slammed into the northern Israeli city of Haifa on Sunday, witnesses said. There was no immediate word on casualties.

2006-05-28 13:41:31

By Philip Pullella and Natalia Reiter OSWIECIM, Poland (Reuters) - Calling himself "a son of Germany," Pope Benedict prayed at the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz on Sunday and asked why God was silent when 1.5 million victims, mostly Jews, died in this "valley of darkness." Ending a four-day pilgrimage to Poland, Benedict, 79, said humans could not fathom "this endless slaughter" but only seek reconciliation for those who suffered "in this place of horror." As on the rest of...

2006-05-28 13:46:36

By Philip Pullella and Natalia Reiter OSWIECIM, Poland (Reuters) - Calling himself "a son of Germany," Pope Benedict prayed at the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz on Sunday and asked why God was silent when 1.5 million victims, mostly Jews, died in this "valley of darkness." Ending a four-day pilgrimage to Poland, Benedict, 79, said humans could not fathom "this endless slaughter" but only seek reconciliation for those who suffered "in this place of horror." As on the rest of...

2006-05-28 12:35:30

By Philip Pullella and Natalia Reiter OSWIECIM, Poland (Reuters) - Calling himself "a son of Germany," Pope Benedict prayed at the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz on Sunday and asked why God was silent when 1.5 million victims, mostly Jews, died in this "valley of darkness." Ending a four-day pilgrimage to Poland, Benedict, 79, said humans could not fathom "this endless slaughter" but only seek reconciliation for those who suffered then and those who now "are suffering in new...

2006-05-28 03:29:57

By Wojciech Moskwa and Philip Pullella KRAKOW, Poland (Reuters) - A huge crowd attended a mass with Pope Benedict on Sunday as the Pontiff prepared to visit the Auschwitz death camp to pray for peace as Catholic leader and a "son of Germany." Benedict said a mass for more than 900,000 people in a sprawling field in Krakow where John Paul, his Polish predecessor, traditionally held huge gatherings with his countrymen before returning to Rome. The throbbing crowd waved a sea of...

2006-05-16 14:30:00

BERLIN (Reuters) - A German archive containing millions of documents from the Second World War will be opened to historians and Holocaust scholars for the first time. The 11-nation committee which oversees the International Tracing Service (ITS) agreed in Luxembourg on Tuesday to change its mandate to allow historians to mine the information it contains, Yad Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial, said in a statement. "Yad Vashem welcomes the decision by the International Commission for the ITS...