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Latest Joanna Aizenberg Stories

New Coating Boots Out Biofilms For Good
2012-07-30 16:23:35

Slippery technology shown to prevent more than 99 percent of harmful bacterial slime from forming on surfaces Biofilms may no longer have any solid ground upon which to stand. A team of Harvard scientists has developed a slick way to prevent the troublesome bacterial communities from ever forming on a surface. Biofilms stick to just about everything, from copper pipes to steel ship hulls to glass catheters. The slimy coatings are more than just a nuisance, resulting in decreased energy...

Smart Materials Getting SMARTer
2012-07-11 17:36:59

Self-powered, homeostatic nanomaterials that actively self-regulate in response to environmental change Living organisms have developed sophisticated ways to maintain stability in a changing environment, withstanding fluctuations in temperature, pH, pressure, and the presence or absence of crucial molecules. The integration of similar features in artificial materials, however, has remained a challenge–until now. In the July 12 issue of Nature, a Harvard-led team of engineers...

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2012-06-13 08:02:48

Derek Walter for redOrbit.com A team of Harvard researchers has developed a superior method for keeping metal surfaces free of ice and frost. It´s a difficult task, but one that could have substantial implications for metal surfaces used in wind turbines, aircraft, refrigeration systems, marine vessels and the construction industry. Airplane wings, railings, and other fabrication parts are just a sample of how often metal is used throughout the world in most of the largest...

Super-Slippery Material Could Make Ketchup Slide Out More Easily
2011-11-14 11:52:04

Scientists have developed one of the most slippery materials ever made after copying the leaves from a carnivorous plant. The material can be used as for self-cleaning surfaces that never get dirty and to coat the inside of bottles and jars to help food escape more easily. The new material repels both water and oil based liquids, making condiments like tomato ketchup or jam slide out easily. "It is a problem we all face — we have a bottle of sauce and we are trying to get the...

Image 1 - Researchers Take Advice From A Carnivorous Plant
2011-09-22 03:45:05

  Bio-inspired coating resists liquids and could lead to a broad range of advances in fuel transport, anti-bacterial surfaces and more After a rain, the cupped leaf of a pitcher plant becomes a virtually frictionless surface. Sweet-smelling and elegant, the carnivore attracts ants, spiders, and even little frogs. One by one, they slide to their doom. Adopting the plant's slick strategy, a group of applied scientists at Harvard have created a material that repels just about any...

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2011-01-08 11:24:23

Surprising discovery about biofilm may provide a new direction in antimicrobial research and bio-inspired liquid-repellent surfaces for use in healthcare, agriculture and industryBy rethinking what happens on the surface of things, engineers at Harvard University have discovered that Bacillus subtilis biofilm colonies exhibit an unmatched ability to repel a wide range of liquids"”and even vapors.Centimeters across yet only hundreds of microns thick, such slimy bacterial coatings cling...

2010-11-15 12:29:17

Nanostructured materials repel water droplets before they have a chance to freeze Engineers from Harvard University have designed and demonstrated ice-free nanostructured materials that literally repel water droplets before they even have the chance to freeze. The finding, reported online in ACS Nano on November 9th, could lead to a new way to keep airplane wings, buildings, powerlines, and even entire highways free of ice during the worst winter weather. Moreover, integrating anti-ice...

2009-12-23 08:14:10

Some of the most common minerals in biology, including those in bones and shells, have a mysterious structure: Their crystals are positioned in the same orientation, making them behave as one giant crystal, even though they do not look like a faceted crystal. It's as if grains of salt were spilled on a rug, yet instead of landing randomly, all wound up with exactly the same angle and rotation. In a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Pupa Gilbert, a professor of physics...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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