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Latest John Bush Stories

Gas Clouds Help Infectious Droplets From Sneezes Travel Farther
2014-04-08 13:00:19

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It is common knowledge that when you sneeze, you are spreading potentially infectious droplets of germs and bacteria into the air around you. While most people have the common courtesy to cover their face when they cough and sneeze, those who don’t could be spreading disease farther than they think. New research from MIT has found that the contents of your sneeze can travel much farther than previously estimated, especially when...

The Dynamics Of Walking Droplets
2013-10-02 04:42:48

[ Watch the Video: Strange Behavior Of Bouncing Drops ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It is possible to make a tiny droplet of fluid levitate on the surface of a vibrating bath, walking or bouncing across, according to a research team led by Yves Couder at the Université Paris Diderot. The droplets, propelled by their own wave fields, exhibit certain features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. This quantum-like behavior...

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2008-08-02 12:30:00

Research shows how insects use trapped oxygen to breathe underwater Hundreds of insect species spend much of their time underwater, where food may be more plentiful. MIT mathematicians have now figured out exactly how those insects breathe underwater. By virtue of their rough, water-repellent coat, when submerged these insects trap a thin layer of air on their bodies. These bubbles not only serve as a finite oxygen store, but also allow the insects to absorb oxygen from the surrounding...

2005-09-28 16:40:17

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--MIT mathematicians have discovered how certain insects can climb what to them are steep, slippery slopes in the water's surface without moving their limbs -- and do it at high speed. Welcome to the world of the tiny creatures that live on the surface of ponds, lakes and other standing bodies of water. There, "all the rules change," said David Hu, a graduate student in the Department of Mathematics and first author of a paper on the work to appear in the Sept. 29 issue of...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'