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Latest John Goodge Stories

Researchers Brave Bone Chilling Cold To Solve Geologic Mysteries
2011-11-01 10:03:48

[ Watch the Video ] Geologist John Goodge looks for clues about Antarctica's past in the 2 percent of the continent that is not covered in ice! The University of Minnesota-Duluth professor has been visiting Antarctica since 1985, finding and studying rocks that help tell the story of how this desolate continent has formed and changed over time. In late 2010 and early 2011, he spent several weeks in the field, with other scientists, visiting a dozen sites along 1,200 miles of...

2008-08-07 06:00:34

By Steve Kuchera, Duluth News-Tribune, Minn. Aug. 7--IT DOESN'T LOOK EXTRAORDINARY -- but a rock found in Antarctica by a University of Minnesota Duluth professor is helping researchers reconstruct what a supercontinent that existed a billion years ago looked like. Analysis of the chunk of granite collected by UMD geology professor John Goodge in 2005 indicate that part of Antarctica and North America were joined 1.4 billion years ago. "We got really lucky -- I had no idea what we were...

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2008-07-17 16:15:00

A lone granite boulder found against all odds high atop a glacier in Antarctica may provide additional key evidence to support a theory that parts of the southernmost continent once were connected to North America hundreds of millions of years ago. Writing in the July 11 edition of the journal Science, an international team of U.S. and Australian investigators  describe their findings, which were made in the Transantarctic Mountains, and their significance to the problem of piecing...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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