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Latest Johns Hopkins Stories

2012-03-24 03:23:11

Experimenting with cells in culture, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have breathed possible new life into two drugs once considered too toxic for human cancer treatment. The drugs, azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine (DAC), are epigenetic-targeted drugs and work to correct cancer-causing alterations that modify DNA. The researchers said the drugs also were found to take aim at a small but dangerous subpopulation of self-renewing cells, sometimes referred to as cancer...

2012-02-14 00:07:33

Johns Hopkins experts estimate nearly 23 million have untreated hearing loss Though an estimated 26.7 million Americans age 50 and older have hearing loss, only about one in seven uses a hearing aid, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The finding adds clarity to less rigorous estimates by device manufacturers and demonstrates how widespread undertreatment of hearing loss is in the United States, the study investigators say. "Understanding current rates of...

2012-02-01 17:20:00

As debates continue about President Obama´s health care overhaul, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Associate Professor Douglas Hough is available to speak as an expert on health care economics. Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) February 01, 2012 Health care will likely become an even hotter news topic as the 2012 presidential campaign unfolds and as the U.S. Supreme Court this spring decides the legality of President Obama´s health care overhaul. Johns Hopkins Carey Business School...

2012-01-17 10:07:38

TV crime shows like Bones and CSI are quick to explain each death by showing highly detailed scans and video images of victims' insides. Traditional autopsies, if shown at all, are at best in supporting roles to the high-tech equipment, and usually gloss over the sometimes physically grueling tasks of sawing through skin and bone. But according to two autopsy and body imaging experts at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, the notion that "virtopsy" could replace traditional autopsy-- made popular...

2011-11-18 06:58:30

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Say what?! You heard right, nearly a fifth of all Americans 12 years or older have hearing loss so severe, it may make communication difficult. The findings suggest that many more people than previously thought are affected by this condition. "This gives us the real scope of the problem for the first time and shows us how big of a problem hearing loss really is," said study leader Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D., and assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine...

Nearly 1-in-5 Americans Have Hearing Loss
2011-11-15 06:34:04

According to a new study, about a fifth of all Americans 12 years or older have hearing loss so severe that it may make communication difficult. The researchers said that the findings suggest that many more people are affected by hearing loss than previously thought. The team said that several previous estimates of hearing loss focused on various cities or populations, like children or elderly patients. "I couldn't find a simple number of how common hearing loss is in the U.S., so we...

2011-10-05 15:15:42

Johns Hopkins-led research suggests levels of certain fats in blood might predict rate of cognitive decline A team of scientists, led by Johns Hopkins researchers, say they may have found a way to predict how quickly patients with Alzheimer´s disease (AD) will lose cognitive function by looking at ratios of two fatty compounds in their blood. The finding, they say, could provide useful information to families and caregivers, and might also suggest treatment targets for this...


Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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