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Latest Jun Lou Stories

Graphene Is Only As Strong As Its Weakest Link
2014-04-29 03:25:10

Mike Williams, Rice University Rice, Georgia Tech experiments determine real-world limits of two-dimensional carbon There is no disputing graphene is strong. But new research by Rice University and the Georgia Institute of Technology should prompt manufacturers to look a little deeper as they consider the miracle material for applications. The atom-thick sheet of carbon discovered this century is touted not just for its electrical properties but also for its physical strength and...

Fine Patterns That Combine Single-atom-thick Graphene And Boron Nitride Created By Researchers
2013-01-28 08:00:21

Rice University Rice University scientists have taken an important step toward the creation of two-dimensional electronics with a process to make patterns in atom-thick layers that combine a conductor and an insulator. The materials at play — graphene and hexagonal boron nitride — have been merged into sheets and built into a variety of patterns at nanoscale dimensions. Rice introduced a technique to stitch the identically structured materials together nearly three years...

2012-04-18 10:29:27

Rice, Tsinghua collaboration could yield low-cost, efficient alternative to silicon-based cells Forests of carbon nanotubes are an efficient alternative for platinum electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC), according to new research by collaborators at Rice University and Tsinghua University. The single-wall nanotube arrays, grown in a process invented at Rice, are both much more electroactive and potentially cheaper than platinum, a common catalyst in DSCs, said Jun Lou, a...

2011-08-29 20:36:07

Rice University researchers surprised to see twin-induced brittle-like fractures in gold nanowires Thin gold wires often used in high-end electronic applications are wonderfully flexible as well as conductive. But those qualities don't necessarily apply to the same wires at the nanoscale. A new study from Rice University finds gold wires less than 20 nanometers wide can become "brittle-like" under stress. It appears in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. The paper by Rice...

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2010-02-16 10:35:00

Welding uses heat to join pieces of metal in everything from circuits to skyscrapers. But Rice University researchers have found a way to beat the heat on the nanoscale. Jun Lou, an assistant professor in mechanical engineering and materials science, and his group have discovered that gold wires between three-billionths and 10-billionths of a meter wide weld themselves together quite nicely "“ without heat. They report in today's online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology that...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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